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Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Post date: March 22, 2009, 13:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2928 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
OpenSUSE

Virtualization With KVM On An OpenSUSE 11.3 Server

Post date: January 6, 2011, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 2612 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an OpenSUSE 11.3 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 14 Server

Post date: December 19, 2010, 17:12 Category: Installing Views: 2356 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 14 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 12 Server

Post date: March 29, 2010, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 2734 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 12 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
CentOS

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 5.2 Server

Post date: April 12, 2009, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 4042 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 5.2 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 11 Server

Post date: June 21, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 3188 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 11 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 13 Server

Post date: June 20, 2010, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 2334 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 13 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
OpenSUSE

Virtualization With KVM On An OpenSUSE 11.4 Server

Post date: April 21, 2011, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 4090 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an OpenSUSE 11.4 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
CentOS

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 6.0 Server

Post date: August 28, 2011, 17:08 Category: Installing Views: 4481 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 6.0 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 5810 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
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