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Unix+clones

KMail In Depth

Post date: April 13, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 2575 Comments
Tutorial quote: KMail has long been my Linux email client of choice for a number of reasons: nice clean interface, easily customizable and configurable, stable, and more features than you can shake a stick at. Today we'll dig into migrating from other email clients, encrypting messages and key signing, and configuring multiple accounts and identities.
Linux

Organizing Your Desktop Communications

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Software Views: 2373 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today we'll look at two great utilities: Tuxcards, the ultimate digital notebook and organizer of zillions of tiny bits of information, and how to use SpamAssassin with KMail without having to run your own mailserver.
Windows

How to install KDE4 applications on Windows

Post date: August 28, 2008, 17:08 Category: Software Views: 5158 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to install and run KDE4 applications natively on Windows. Windows 2000, XP, and Vista are supported. KOffice, Kopete, Amarok, Ktorrent, Konquerror, KDevelop, K3b, Kmail, Dolphin are only some of them.
SuSe

Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: System Views: 3438 Comments
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3060 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 5783 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink