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Linux

Manage Your Music Efficiently in Linux

Post date: August 4, 2008, 19:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 3416 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today PC's have become a major source of entertainment ... Whether its listening Music, watching Movies , playing Games or chatting in past time.. PC has does it all to keep you entertained for a long period of time.. PC has now turned to a jukebox now apart from what they are mainly meant for !

Today people generally store their Music in their PC .. Keeping Music in PC has lots of advantages like you have a Soft copy always accessible from anywhere, can easily backup/delete music collection, saves space by not utilizing DVD's/Cd's considering Online Music Shops. Easy management and Quicker Search..

Keeping Music in Cd's and similar stuff is hard.. As you just can't carry every Media's with you and compiling you favorite song collection to Cd's and DVD's will consume too much recourse.. With the arrival of Portable Media player like iPod, Walkman, Zen and others carrying music was so easy..

But to keep your Music collection updated and proper you must keep them in proper way.. A properly tagged and named music file will be easy to find else you will just waste your time searching the Gb's of your Disk..

So why waste time ? Just go through the guide and you will know how to easily and efficiently manage your Music Collection in GNU/Linux OS..
Ubuntu

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin in Ubuntu

Post date: February 13, 2007, 18:02 Category: Network Views: 3975 Comments
Tutorial quote: Munin” means “memory”.Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the
information in in graphs through a web interface. Its mphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily
monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine “what’s different today” when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you’re doing
capacity wise on all limited resources.
Debian

Running A File-, Print-, Proxy-, DHCP-, AND Time-Server For Small/Medium Enterprises

Post date: October 18, 2006, 18:10 Category: System Views: 3937 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how to run a file-, print-, HTTP proxy- DHCP-, and time server for small and medium enterprises (SME) on one single Debian Sarge system. It is very easy to set up, and management is done with an easy-to-use web interface called eBox so once the system is set up, you can forget about the command line. eBox was developed to administrate advanced services for corporate networks, and it was created for Debian Sarge.
FreeBSD

Build your own gateway firewall

Post date: April 11, 2006, 21:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4923 Comments
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 2495 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Debian

Detailed Bacula Network Backup Implementation Guide

Post date: June 6, 2006, 19:06 Category: Software Views: 3556 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is very detailed tutorial for implemeting bacula network backup in debian linux.This tutorial contails totally 4 pages.

Bacula is a set of computer programs that permits you (or the system administrator) to manage backup, recovery, and verification of computer data across a network of computers of different kinds. Bacula can also run entirely upon a single computer, and can backup to various types of media, including tape and disk.

In technical terms, it is a network Client/Server based backup program. Bacula is relatively easy to use and efficient, while offering many advanced storage management features that make it easy to find and recover lost or damaged files. Due to its modular design, Bacula is scalable from small single computer systems to systems consisting of hundreds of computers located over a large network.
Unix+clones

Introduction to PHP

Post date: July 3, 2007, 06:07 Category: Programming Views: 4268 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial covers the basics of PHP in an easy to understand fashion. Well categorized topics and illustrations.
Linux

Building a Linux video jukebox for an anime convention

Post date: November 25, 2005, 21:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3036 Comments
Tutorial quote: I wrote this little whitepaper a while back for Amy Zunk to document the function of the VideoKeg/VideoJukebox boxes. Documented here for posterity. The primary goal of the video keg was to build a reliable video box that was easy to transport with enough space to store 3 days worth of Anime fan-subs.

The secondary goal of the video keg was to make a home PVR system for video playback and time-shifting, along with a video arcade and perhaps a web browser. The tertiary goal of the video keg was to find an affordable hardware platform so that we could buy 4 of them immmediately to service the primary goal's need for 4 separate video rooms.

For a PVR, the machine neeed to be small, quiet, low-heat, and still fast enough to run the software video player and arcade games. For portability, we decided to go with a smaller mini-ITX style cube box.
Unix+clones

Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen

Post date: August 9, 2005, 19:08 Category: Network Views: 2776 Comments
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
Ubuntu

Insights for a quick and easy Ubuntu printer installation

Post date: June 4, 2006, 18:06 Category: Hardware Views: 7126 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu makes printing reasonably easy and straightforward. This brief article is for those who need a specific and encouraging step-by-step guide. I hope that this article will not only ensure that you print with ease, but that you have every reason to enjoy a productive GNU/Linux desktop.

Before you begin the installation steps below, connect your printer/s. You need to do this prior to turning your system on. This helps to ensure Ubuntu recognizes how the printer is connected to the system, and it allows Ubuntu to identify the specific printer port.

Please don’t be dismayed if you plug in your printer and it’s not immediately recognized. I assure you that Ubuntu recognizes the printer. However, you will first need to configure the printer as an available device so other programs can use it.

The Ubuntu Printing Configuration Tool is used to accomplish this. For my example I will use an HP Deskjet printer connected to the Ubuntu system via a USB cable. However, these steps will also apply to printers that connect via a direct or Parallel cable.
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