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Linux

A Beginner's Guide To LVM

Post date: January 16, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 3882 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to work with LVM (Logical Volume Management) on Linux. It also describes how to use LVM together with RAID1 in an extra chapter. As LVM is a rather abstract topic, this article comes with a Debian Etch VMware image that you can download and start, and on that Debian Etch system you can run all the commands I execute here and compare your results with mine. Through this practical approach you should get used to LVM very fast.
Unix+clones

Hide your folders in KDE

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: Desktop Views: 3099 Comments
Tutorial quote: Want to keep your MP3s away from your boss’ or big brother’s view? Of course, in Linux anything that starts with a period is “suppose” to be hidden; but all we have to do is type “ls -A” or turn on the viewing of hidden files in KDE…not too hard. Basically what we can do is set a transparent PNG as our folder icon, and rename our folder with a ” “(space). This will actually keep the previous name of the folder.Also we will keep anyone out of the folder that doesn’t know Linux commands, and doesn’t know exactly where we have placed the icon. This works GREAT for the desktop.
Unix+clones

Keyboard shortcuts: Faster than the speed of mouse

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2675 Comments
Tutorial quote: My computer set-up is suboptimal. My desk is too high for me to type on comfortably. My workaround? I type with my keyboard on my lap. That puts the keyboard at just the right height and is kinder to my wrists. My mouse, however, has to sit on my desk. Using my mouse involves moving my hand a foot in each direction.

While this action might conceivably bulk up my arm muscles, I would rather not do my arm exercises while at my computer. Using the mouse is time consuming, distracting, and, most importantly, less ergonomic. While your computer may be better situated than mine, chances are you, too, would work faster if you did not have to use your mouse.

To minimize my mouse use, I learned many of the keyboard bindings for various applications. Many applications use similar bindings, making them even easier to remember.

I have compiled a list of keyboard bindings here for some of the more prevalent applications. Feel free to print them out and keep them next to your computer. It may take you a little time to remember them, but once you do, you will wonder how you ever did without.
Solaris

Configuring networking

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 5273 Comments
Tutorial quote: Networking information in Solaris is stored in text files. Configuration is done by filling in the appriopriate data to these files and invoking specific commands in a terminal window.
Linux

ffmpeg Cheat Sheet - 19 Best Practices

Post date: August 12, 2009, 11:08 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4123 Comments
Tutorial quote: ffmpeg is a multiplatform, open-source library for video and audio files. It is usualy available in your distribution repositories, so search for it and install it.

This article will present 19 ffmpeg very useful commands.
Unix+clones

Writing Shell Scripts

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Programming Views: 3781 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the thousands of commands available for the command line user, how can you remember them all? The answer is, you don't. The real power of the computer is its ability to do the work for you. To get it to do that, we use the power of the shell to automate things. We write scripts.
Debian

Installation of Tacacs+, Rancid, Cvsweb

Post date: August 16, 2006, 16:08 Category: Network Views: 11453 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article will describe you how to install a complete solution to manage users that have access to your network devices and also how to backup your network devices configurations with a cvs based storage in order to have diffs on it. You'll also be able to script commands you want to run on your routers/switches to have easier administration.
Debian

Majordomo Configuration

Post date: April 10, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 2311 Comments
Tutorial quote: Majordomo is a program which automates the management of Internet mailing lists. Commands are sent to Majordomo via electronic mail to handle all aspects of list maintenance. Once a list is set up, virtually all operations can be performed remotely by email, requiring no intervention upon the postmaster of the list site.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3427 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Linux

Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 4098 Comments
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink