Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Linux tools for study and analysis of biological information

Debian

Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Security Views: 5353 Comments
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Fedora+Core

Enhancing Apache with mod_security

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Security Views: 3392 Comments
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Linux

Scheduling Backup Jobs using at and crontab

Post date: April 21, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 2755 Comments
Tutorial quote: You can schedule a command or a script using two tools

crontab : Schedules tasks once or repeatedly.

You can use the crontab command to run commands at regular times. For example, you could schedule a backup of your files every Friday. Commands can be scheduled to the minute.

at : Schedules tasks once.

You can use the at command to schedule a command or script to run a single time. The command includes several utilities
Unix+clones

Chkrootkit Portsentry Howto

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Security Views: 3380 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install chkrootkit and portsentry. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems.

Chkrootkit "is a tool to locally check for signs of a rootkit" (from http://www.chkrootkit.org).

"The Sentry tools provide host-level security services for the Unix platform. PortSentry, Logcheck/LogSentry, and HostSentry protect against portscans, automate log file auditing, and detect suspicious login activity on a continuous basis" (from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sentrytools/).

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Linux

Automating the Login Script

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3084 Comments
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Unix+clones

CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash

Post date: January 25, 2006, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 3546 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.
Ubuntu

Simple Package management with Synaptic Package Manager

Post date: December 5, 2006, 22:12 Category: System Views: 4682 Comments
Tutorial quote: Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. Synaptic uses the GTK graphic libraries . So, if you are using GNOME on your debian-based distro you will probably have Synaptic installed as well. Synaptic is a graphical package management program for apt. It provides the same features as the apt-get command line utility with a GUI front-end based on Gtk+.
Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3006 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Unix+clones

CGI Programming on the World Wide Web

Post date: December 12, 2005, 17:12 Category: Programming Views: 3663 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Common Gateway Interface (CGI) emerged as the first way to present dynamically generated information on the World Wide Web. CGI allows the computer to generate Web pages instantly at the user's request rather than being written by someone in advance. And at the time of this writing, it remains the only stable and well-understood method for creating such pages. Java presents problems that have not yet been solved. Other products are currently just in the announcement stage.

CGI is fun. You can get a kick out of writing scripts that perform tricks for you, and the users enjoy the spice the scripts add to your Web pages. But CGI has a serious side too: It lets the Internet offer the kind of interactive, user-driven applications that modern computer users have come to expect. CGI opens up an entire class of modern applications to the Web.
Ubuntu

Installing Tomcat6 With SUN-Java & Apache2 Integration On Ubuntu 10.04

Post date: February 2, 2011, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache Tomcat (or Jakarta Tomcat or simply Tomcat) is an open source servlet container developed by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). Tomcat implements the Java Servlet and the JavaServer Pages (JSP) specifications from Sun Microsystems, and provides a "pure Java" HTTP web server environment for Java code to run. Tomcat should not be confused with the Apache web server, which is a C implementation of an HTTP web server; these two web servers are not bundled together. Apache Tomcat includes tools for configuration and management, but can also be configured by editing XML configuration files.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink