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Debian

How To Create A Debian Wheezy (Testing) OpenVZ Template

Post date: September 15, 2011, 08:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5759 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to create an OpenVZ template for Debian Wheezy (Debian Testing) that you can use to create virtual Debian Wheezy machines under OpenVZ. I searched for a Debian Wheezy OpenVZ template, but couldn't find one, that's why I decided to create it myself. This guide can also be used for creating Debian Lenny templates and templates for recent Ubuntu versions.
OpenSUSE

Cairo-Dock - Desktop dock for openSUSE Linux

Post date: August 6, 2008, 22:08 Category: Desktop Views: 4580 Comments
Tutorial quote: Cairo-Dock is a simple but effective feature rich dock for your openSUSE Linux. Ever since, Fabounet proposed a version improved, with a very ergonomic configuration newer versions are followed at an intensive pace and with their new functionalities like the sub-docks, the effects on the launchers … Many people were grafted with the project, each one bringing its competences, of graphics, to the applet or plugins and development.
Linux

Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 3272 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
RedHat

NIST Publically-Released Red Hat Enterprise Linux Benchmark

Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7739 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 4712 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Debian

Little-known APT utilities for Debian desktop users

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 3325 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) is a distinguishing feature of Debian-based systems. APT was the first major alternative in GNU/Linux to boast automatic dependency resolution. Most GNU/Linux users know it through the apt-get command, a utility that calls on the lower-level dpkg command. However, other APT-based utilities remain largely unknown to desktop users. Some of these utilities offer a range of functionality far beyond those of the basic tools.
Ubuntu

How to Install and Configure DHCP Server in Ubuntu Server

Post date: December 22, 2008, 07:12 Category: Software Views: 6141 Comments
Tutorial quote: A DHCP Server assigns IP addresses to client computers. This is very often used in enterprise networks to reduce configuration efforts. All IP addresses of all computers are stored in a database that resides on a server machine.A DHCP server can provide configuration settings using two methods

Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5349 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 16, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 5504 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Lenny

Post date: July 14, 2009, 09:07 Category: Installing Views: 7661 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
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