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Search results for Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID

Linux

Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 2757 Comments
Tutorial quote: Systems administrators managing a data center face numerous challenges to achieve required availability and uptime. Two of the main challenges are shrinking budgets (for hardware, software, and staffing) and short deadlines in which to deliver solutions. The Linux community has developed kernel support for software RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) to help meet those challenges. Software RAID, properly implemented, can eliminate system downtime caused by disk drive errors. The source code to the Linux kernel, the RAID modules, and the raidtools package are available at minimal cost under the GNU Public License. The interface is well documented and comprehensible to a moderately experienced Linux systems administrator.

In this article, I'll provide an overview of the software RAID implementation in the Linux 2.4.X kernel. I will describe the creation and activation of software RAID devices as well as the management of active RAID devices. Finally, I will discuss some procedures for recovering from a failed disk unit.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: April 28, 2008, 17:04 Category: System Views: 6035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?

Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3684 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Debian

Debian RAID 1/5 system installer

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3126 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
OpenSUSE

Network Monitoring and Management Tool

Post date: January 27, 2009, 07:01 Category: Network Views: 5530 Comments
Tutorial quote: AutoScan-Network is a network discovering and managing application. No configuration is required to scan your network. The main goal is to print the list of connected equipments in your network.
OpenBSD

OpenBSD encrypted raid disk

Post date: November 6, 2009, 10:11 Category: System Views: 5256 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explain process to create encryped device with vnd driver stored on logical raid disk (Raid 1 - 0)
Gentoo

RAID over NFS

Post date: June 17, 2005, 11:06 Category: Network Views: 3948 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a HowTo to create a RAID over NFS. In this case RAID5, but can be easily adopted for other RAID levels.
Linux

Flexnet License Monitoring With rrdtool

Post date: July 15, 2010, 11:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5860 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some of you may know the commercial Flexnet Licencing Application (İMacrovision). It's a client-server based solution for managing the usage of socalled Flexnet-enabled applications. You can hold licenses of more than one product on one license-server. As you typically have to buy licenses and licenses can be expensive it would be nice to have a monitoring solution to see the utilization of the precious licenses, whether they are underutilized (so money is wasted) or are always fully utilized (so that you can suspect that sometimes people cannot do their work, or only delayed) which is also a waste of resources. As far as I know there are commercial applications for performing such reports, but again you have to spend money. Why not build a simple system yourself, which shows the actual and past usage in an "MRTG style"?
Ubuntu

Network Management And Monitoring With Hyperic HQ On Ubuntu 7.04

Post date: August 26, 2007, 23:08 Category: Network Views: 3990 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Hyperic HQ on Ubuntu 7.04. The resulting system provides an awesome, web-based "Systems-Management-Software". It is the next stage of classical monitoring and able to manage all kinds of operating systems, web servers, application servers and database servers.
Linux

Bandwidth monitoring with iptables

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Network Views: 3694 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux has a number of useful bandwidth monitoring and management programs. A quick search on Freshmeat.net for bandwidth returns a number of applications. However, if all you need is a basic overview of your total bandwidth usage, iptables is all you really need -- and it's already installed if you're using a Linux distribution based on the 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernels.
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