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Search results for Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID

Ubuntu

How to Integrate windows Active Directory and Samba in Ubuntu

Post date: November 11, 2008, 19:11 Category: System Views: 6040 Comments
Tutorial quote: Samba is an Open Source/Free Software suite that provides seamless file and print services to SMB/CIFS clients.” Samba is freely available, unlike other SMB/CIFS implementations, and allows for interoperability between Linux/Unix servers and Windows-based clients.
Yellow+Dog

Installing Linux on the Mac mini

Post date: May 11, 2005, 12:05 Category: Installing Views: 6909 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Debian

High-Availability Storage With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 9, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4397 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a high-availability storage with two storage servers (Debian Lenny) that use GlusterFS. Each storage server will be a mirror of the other storage server, and files will be replicated automatically across both storage servers. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

Apt-Cacher-NG - HTTP download proxy for software packages

Post date: February 24, 2009, 07:02 Category: System Views: 4381 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apt-Cacher-ng is a software package that keeps a cache, on the disk, of Debian/Ubuntu Packages and Release files.When an apt-get like client issues a request for a file, Apt-Cacher intercepts it and if the file is already cached it serves it to the client immediately, otherwise it fetches the file from the Internet, saves it on the cache, and then serves it to the client. This means that several Debian machines can be upgraded but each package need to be downloaded only once.
Unix+clones

Emulating an OS with qemu

Post date: May 22, 2005, 08:05 Category: Emulation Views: 4884 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3870 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Unix+clones

How-To: Stream almost anything using VLC

Post date: November 29, 2005, 20:11 Category: Software Views: 5539 Comments
Tutorial quote: The VLC media player is an amazing piece of software. In its most basic form it is a lightweight media player that can play almost any audio or video format you throw at it. VLC is also multiplatform in the most extreme sense of the word; it can run on Windows, OSX, Linux and PocketPC / WinCE handhelds along with other systems. VLC works great as a streaming server and video transcoder too.
Unix+clones

The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 3192 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
Debian

Striping Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: July 12, 2009, 10:07 Category: Installing Views: 3731 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to do data striping (segmentation of logically sequential data, such as a single file, so that segments can be assigned to multiple physical devices in a round-robin fashion and thus written concurrently) across four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) with GlusterFS. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 3241 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
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