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FreeBSD

Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100 (part 2)

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: System Views: 3422 Comments
Tutorial quote: Editorial note: This is the followup to Greg's previous piece, and continues where part one left off. It is recommended that you read and understand the content presented in part one before attempting any of the procedures documented here. Now without further ado...
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 2

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3694 Comments
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 2727 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Ubuntu

Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part 2

Post date: September 20, 2006, 22:09 Category: Network Views: 7176 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is the second part of the introduction to FireHOL article. It covers more advanced topics that you might find useful, such as defining new services, selective filtering, and NAT. Everything is explained in a very detailed fashion.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3604 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Unix+clones

A web server in a shell script

Post date: March 14, 2006, 08:03 Category: Programming Views: 16470 Comments
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2702 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3579 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Customization Guide v2

Post date: November 26, 2007, 05:11 Category: Desktop Views: 5715 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today with a hike in Linux acceptance its pretty hard for competitors to provide similar solutions at free of cost. Open Source is known for User Interaction with Operating System which cannot be done with other OS. Linux user can customize, create, edit, add files according to his/her taste..and customization is the part where Linux is one step ahead of every OS.
Linux

Use Webmin for Linux Administration

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 3299 Comments
Tutorial quote: Administering Linux and Unix-based servers does not need to be the scourge of your work day. With a handy tool called Webmin as part of your arsenal, you can regain complete control of your servers via the Web browser.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink