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Search results for My First Linux Server, Part 1

Linux

Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 4654 Comments
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
OpenBSD

Apache - Serving up the Web

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 8545 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux

Feed Your Virus Worries to a Clam

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3327 Comments
Tutorial quote: Last week, we looked at how to set up SpamAssassin with Postfix, as part of a lean, mean, spam-killing gateway machine. This week we'll add an anti-virus scanner to our bubbling brew.
Ubuntu

Video Surveillance With ZoneMinder On Ubuntu

Post date: September 9, 2007, 00:09 Category: Desktop Views: 8764 Comments
Tutorial quote: ZoneMinder is the top Linux video camera security and surveillance solution. In this document I will cover how to get ZoneMinder up and running on Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS or Dapper Drake with the recent updates included. The surveillance system I am covering here utilizes 4 Dome CCTV cameras hooked up to a single Kodicom kmc-8800 capture card, in addition I also used infra red LEDs so my cameras could see in the dark (honestly I am abit scared to look). ZoneMinder also does a good job with IP Cameras, unfortunately they are considerably expensive in my part of the world, hence 4 cameras would blow my budget.
Debian

A couple of tricks with the secure shell

Post date: September 18, 2006, 13:09 Category: Network Views: 12292 Comments
Tutorial quote: One can do a lot more with ssh than use it for remote terminal session. Here we'll show how to copy files using ssh, use ssh as part of a pipe, vnc or samba forwarding via ssh and mounting filesystems using ssh (fuse + sshfs).
Debian

Easier file renaming with renameutils

Post date: December 8, 2008, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 3123 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever been faced with a collection of files that need renaming and nearly gone mad from trying to do it manually?
Lots of typing mv, or lots of right click -> rename. Enter qmv, part of renameutils.

RedHat

How to set up a home DNS server

Post date: December 17, 2006, 17:12 Category: Network Views: 11254 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the first part of this series on the Domain Name System (DNS), we set up a caching nameserver that allowed our clients to take advantage of faster network operations by caching frequently requested DNS queries. In this article, we will extend our caching nameserver to a master nameserver that is responsible for managing the authoritative information for our internal client hostnames.
Linux

Monitoring disk space and usage

Post date: June 17, 2006, 15:06 Category: Software Views: 5075 Comments
Tutorial quote: Monitoring disk space is a vital part of your job as a UNIX administrator. This article gives you the tools you need to be successful, including the use of df, du, find, and even the use of quotas. Let's get started by taking a look at how useful df can be.
Linux

Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3289 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4070 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
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