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Ubuntu

Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL And SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 8.04 LTS)

Post date: May 22, 2008, 09:05 Category: Installing Views: 3717 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server based that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I will also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota. Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.
Fedora

Virtual Users & Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Fedora 10)

Post date: February 1, 2009, 11:02 Category: Installing Views: 3934 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota (quota is not built into Postfix by default, I'll show how to patch your Postfix appropriately). Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database (most documents I found were dealing with plain text passwords which is a security risk). In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.
FreeBSD

How I created my own .mac replacement

Post date: February 7, 2006, 21:02 Category: Network Views: 4257 Comments
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
Gentoo

Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat

Post date: January 29, 2006, 13:01 Category: Network Views: 12969 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 6610 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
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