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Search results for OpenBSD 101 - Tutorial for Beginners

BSD

Firewalling with OpenBSD's PF packet filter

Post date: November 27, 2006, 02:11 Category: Network Views: 7477 Comments
Tutorial quote: The tutorial is about firewalls and related functions, with examples from real life with the OpenBSD project's PF (Packet Filter). PF offers firewalling, NAT, traffic control and bandwidth management in a single, flexible and sysadmin friendly system. Targeted at the seasoned or aspiring network administrator, this half day tutorial manuscript will give you some ideas about how to control your network traffic the way you want - keeping some things outside your network, directing traffic to specified hosts or services, and of course, giving spammers a hard time.

Previously hosted at http:/www.bgnett.no/~peter/pf/, but moved to its present location due to some odd technical difficulties at bgnett.no.
Unix+clones

Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3533 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Fedora+Core

VNC (Virtual Network Computing) 101

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3671 Comments
Tutorial quote: VNC stands for Virtual Network Computing. It is remote control software which allows you to view and interact with one computer (the "server") using a simple program (the "viewer") on another computer anywhere on the Internet. The two computers don't even have to be the same type, so for example you can use VNC to view an office Linux machine on your Windows PC at home. VNC is freely and publicly available and is in widespread active use by millions throughout industry, academia and privately.
Unix+clones

Tutorial : Create Mac like Wallpaper with Gimp.

Post date: March 25, 2008, 03:03 Category: Software Views: 3020 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever wondered how those glossy and stupendous wallpapers are created ? If not ! Then let me take you on a tour which will help you to create glossy wallpapers without any havoc.. This guide is targeted towards beginners .. I have tried my best to make it simple .. Being an Open Source user and FOSS follower I always use Open Source software to do my work. In this tutorial I had used GNU Image Manipulation Program [Gimp 2.4.2] to create wallpaper, so this tutorial will be focused on GIMP while people using Photoshop can still use the same technique to create this wallpaper..
Ubuntu

Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide

Post date: April 13, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5058 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is probably the best guide for beginners with Ubuntu. It will help you setup Ubuntu in no time. Amongst other things it will walk you through installing BitTorrent client, edonkey client, email clients, browsers and a lot more. Definitely worth checking out.
OpenBSD

OpenBSD encrypted raid disk

Post date: November 6, 2009, 10:11 Category: System Views: 5288 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explain process to create encryped device with vnd driver stored on logical raid disk (Raid 1 - 0)
FreeBSD

FreeBSD Networking Basics

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3626 Comments
Tutorial quote: Beginners to Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD are often stymied by their network settings. Sure, the install process may have set up your NIC for you, but where do you go to view these settings, and how do you proceed if your NIC stops working? Since networking is such an integral part of computing, this article will demonstrate how to verify, configure, and optimize your network settings.
Ubuntu

LAMP Installation On Ubuntu 6.06 For Beginners

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Installing Views: 41388 Comments
Tutorial quote: I, like many others, made the decision to attempt an install of Ubuntu 6.06 server with the preconfigured LAMP option without having ever attempted using Linux before. My goal was to build a setup that I could host my personal web site from. [...] Hence, I am writing this as a partial documentation of my trials and tribulations with hopes of aiding all Linux noobs on the steps necessary to create a basic Linux, Apache2, MySQL5 and PHP5 system with FTP.
Ubuntu

The extremely simple guide to installing Ubuntu using Wubi

Post date: October 12, 2008, 17:10 Category: Installing Views: 3879 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many people are put off using Ubuntu because of installation issues. Not that installation is difficult, of
course, but for the true non-technical user, it’s equivalent to scaling Mount Everest.

This guide is for them. It’s a step-by-step guide to installing Ubuntu for complete and utter beginners. If you
have a relative, or friend, who would like to try Ubuntu, but who is frankly scared of the prospect, then send them a link to this posting! It assumes zero prior knowledge.
Unix+clones

Python Programming for Beginners

Post date: September 19, 2006, 09:09 Category: Programming Views: 44141 Comments
Tutorial quote: Despite what assembly code and C coders might tell us, high-level languages do have their place in every programmer's toolbox, and some of them are much more than a computer-science curiosity. Out of the many high-level languages we can choose from today, Python seems to be the most interesting for those who want to learn something new and do real work at the same time. Its no-nonsense implementation of object-oriented programming and its clean and easy-to-understand syntax make it a language that is fun to learn and use, which is not something we can say about most other languages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write applications that use command-line options, read and write to pipes, access environment variables, handle interrupts, read from and write to files, create temporary files and write to system logs. In other words, you will find recipes for writing real applications instead of the old boring Hello, World! stuff.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink