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Search results for Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III

Arch

The Perfect Desktop - Kubuntu 11.04

Post date: May 15, 2011, 19:05 Category: Desktop Views: 5188 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Kubuntu 11.04 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Kubuntu 11.04 is derived from Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) and uses the KDE desktop instead of the GNOME desktop.
Fedora

Xen With Graphical User Interface On A Fedora 7 Desktop

Post date: September 18, 2007, 22:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4024 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Xen on Fedora 7. Xen enables the paravirtualization of your hardware for its virtual machines if you have a CPU with Vanderpool (Intel) or Pacifica (AMD) technology. The paravirtualization provides high performance to your virtual machines. Fedora's virt-manager provides an easy to use GUI for setting up and managing your virtual machines. It does not have the extensive features like VMware Server, but the basics are in place.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 3577 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
OpenSUSE

Network Performance Fine Tuning in openSUSE & SUSE

Post date: October 8, 2008, 23:10 Category: Network Views: 5118 Comments
Tutorial quote: openSUSE and SUSE Linux sets default values for some of the network related Kernel parameters. With Kernel 2.6 (default in recent releases of openSUSE & SuSE Linux), there are some fine tuning you can do to improve Network performance and get that extra out of your system.
CentOS

Installing Beryl On A CentOS 5.0 Desktop

Post date: July 22, 2007, 23:07 Category: Desktop Views: 6314 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use Beryl on a CentOS 5.0 desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card). With Beryl, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube.
Ubuntu

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 11.04 Desktop (With The Unity Desktop)

Post date: July 3, 2011, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 3723 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) desktop with the Unity interface (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card which I assume it has because otherwise Unity wouldn't start, and GNOME would be used instead). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4281 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 4739 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Kubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

Post date: May 1, 2008, 10:05 Category: Desktop Views: 4089 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Kubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Kubuntu 8.04 is derived from Ubuntu 8.04 LTS and uses the KDE desktop instead of the GNOME desktop.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 4518 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
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