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Search results for Optimizing Mac OS X performance

Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I

Post date: May 16, 2005, 23:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3660 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
OSX

VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4

Post date: December 10, 2005, 08:12 Category: Network Views: 5689 Comments
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
Yellow+Dog

Installing Linux on the Mac mini

Post date: May 11, 2005, 12:05 Category: Installing Views: 6125 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Unix+clones

Considerations for the system architect: Performance

Post date: April 20, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2844 Comments
Tutorial quote: For many developers and engineers, performance is often an afterthought. But when a product functions as designed and has proven stability and the right feature mix, success in the marketplace often depends upon performance. Architectural decisions define the ultimate feasible performance of any product. In this article, learn how performance-monitoring technology initially developed for mainframes can help you improve your own code's performance.
FreeBSD

How I created my own .mac replacement

Post date: February 7, 2006, 21:02 Category: Network Views: 3457 Comments
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
OSX

A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3476 Comments
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
OSX

Mac OS X Server Administrator's Guide

Post date: June 8, 2005, 05:06 Category: System Views: 6101 Comments
Tutorial quote: Includes information on how Mac OS X Server software works
and strategies for using it with your network
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 2705 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3343 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Gentoo

Gentoo on MAC OSX

Post date: April 12, 2005, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 2965 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing Gentoo for Mac OS X is as easy as simply following the directions below.
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