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Search results for Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU

Linux

Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU

Post date: June 1, 2005, 07:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 3133 Comments
Tutorial quote: The tools to analyze the performance of applications are varied and have existed in one form or another since the early days of UNIX. It is critical to understand how an application is interacting with the operating system, CPU, and memory system to understand its performance. This chapter will help you understand where the bottleneck in your system is occuring, and how to fix it.
Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 5786 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
OSX

Optimizing Mac OS X performance

Post date: January 18, 2006, 16:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 7017 Comments
Tutorial quote: This FAQ provides recommendations for optimizing MacĀ® OS X performance. Additionally, it provides advice and links to advice for troubleshooting certain Mac OS X performance problems.
Debian

How To Limit CPU Usage Of A Process With cpulimit (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: September 14, 2009, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3323 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can limit the CPU usage of a process with the tool cpulimit on Debian/Ubuntu. cpulimit is a simple program that attempts to limit the CPU usage of a process (expressed in percentage, not in cpu time). This is useful to control batch jobs, when you don't want them to eat too much CPU. It does not act on the nice value or other scheduling priority stuff, but on the real CPU usage. Also, it is able to adapt itself to the overall system load, dynamically and quickly.
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 2711 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III

Post date: May 31, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4266 Comments
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
Linux

Change Ctrl + Alt + Delete Behavior To Open System Monitor, in Linux

Post date: September 24, 2009, 12:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2016 Comments
Tutorial quote: Actually, I've written this post before (quite a few months ago) but then deleted it because it didn't work. In the mean time, I found out why, so I decided to post it again. I find pressing Control + Alt + Delete to open up System Monitor to be very useful, especially for Windows users who are used to it and may actually press this quite a few times before realizing it doesn't do anything or what it does in Windows. Using System Monitor, you can preview all running processes, end or kill them, see how much CPU a process is using, CPU + memory + network history, available disk space and even change how much CPU a process should use.

There are 2 ways of changing Ctrl + Alt + Delete behavior to open System Monitor: one if you are running Compiz, and one for Metacity, only to use if you are not running Compiz.
Unix+clones

Optimizing C/C++ programs using the GProf profiler

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 6537 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the most important things to keep in mind while optimizing an application is: optimize where it counts. It is no use to spend hours optimizing a piece of code that usually runs for only 0.04 seconds anyway.

GProf provides a surprisingly easy way to profile your C/C++ application and spot the interesting pieces right away. A small case study shows how GProf was used to reduce the running time of a real-world application from over 3 minutes to under 5 seconds, by identifying 2 data structures as important and optimizing those.

Historically, the program goes back as far as 1982, when it was introduced on the the SIGPLAN Symposium on Compiler Construction. It is now a standard tool available on virtually all flavors of UNIX.
Linux

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: April 1, 2006, 03:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 4280 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Unix+clones

Comparing MySQL performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3382 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
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