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Unix+clones

Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Post date: November 26, 2005, 01:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 3609 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 2730 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
OpenSUSE

Network Performance Fine Tuning in openSUSE & SUSE

Post date: October 8, 2008, 23:10 Category: Network Views: 4242 Comments
Tutorial quote: openSUSE and SUSE Linux sets default values for some of the network related Kernel parameters. With Kernel 2.6 (default in recent releases of openSUSE & SuSE Linux), there are some fine tuning you can do to improve Network performance and get that extra out of your system.
Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 5804 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
Unix+clones

Postfix performance tuning

Post date: May 21, 2005, 11:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3420 Comments
Tutorial quote: Postfix is fast out of the box, but like other packages, you can usually tune it to work even faster. Furthermore, there are situations where Postfix may not perform as well as you expected, whether because of hardware or software limitations on the server system or other adverse conditions, such as a big influx of spam or undeliverable mail. This article shows you how to find and analyze the most common performance problems.
Linux

Profiling in Linux Performance Tuning

Post date: December 18, 2005, 21:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 3428 Comments
Tutorial quote: This chapter covers several methods to measure execution time and real-time performance. The methods give different types of granularity, from the program’s complete execution time to how long each function in the program takes.
RedHat

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8575 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Gentoo

GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks

Post date: April 20, 2005, 10:04 Category: Security Views: 3052 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III

Post date: May 31, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4286 Comments
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
Debian

Stack Smashing Protection for Debian

Post date: June 23, 2006, 22:06 Category: Security Views: 2841 Comments
Tutorial quote: Since we last covered the use of Stack Smashing Protection (SSP) the default compiler for Debian Sid has been upgraded to include it, with no need for custom patching. Read on for a brief demonstration of how it can be used to prevent attacks.

The default C compiler for Sid, which will be used in Etch too, is GCC v4.1. This releasecontains the SSP patch which previously needed to be applied manually (we demonstrated applying this patch for GCC v3.4 a long time ago).

Since the SSP patch is included in the compiler by default it is suddenly a lot easier to start working with it.
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