Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Linux

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: April 1, 2006, 03:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 4304 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Unix+clones

Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3486 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Unix+clones

Comparing MySQL performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3408 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3370 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Linux

Measuring the Performance of HTTP Web Servers using ApacheBench (ab)

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4687 Comments
Tutorial quote: ApacheBench is a command line utility for measuring the performance of HTTP web servers, in particular the Apache HTTP Server. It was designed to give an idea of the performance that a given Apache installation can provide. In particular, it shows how many requests per second the server is capable of serving.
Linux

Check Your Mysql Server Performance with MySQLTuner

Post date: November 30, 2008, 20:11 Category: Software Views: 2744 Comments
Tutorial quote: MySQLTuner is a script written in Perl that will assist you with your MySQL configuration and make recommendations for increased performance and stability. Within seconds, it will display statistics about your MySQL installation and the areas where it can be improved.
Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 1

Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 2383 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux clusters have escaped. As the general popularity of the Linux operating system increases, more complex solutions built with it are becoming increasingly common in the "traditional" (more conservative) IT world. Linux computer clusters, whose provenance was originally universities and research institutions such as the U.S. National Laboratories, are showing up in increasing numbers as high-performance computing solutions within such areas as oil and gas exploration, computer-aided engineering, visualization, and software development. Linux clusters providing highly-available web, mail, and other infrastructure services are also increasingly common. If past computing history is any indicator of future trends, widespread use of Linux clusters in the mainstream IT world cannot be far behind.
Linux

Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3007 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Debian

Aggregating network interfaces

Post date: February 12, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 2991 Comments
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink