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Search results for Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Ubuntu

Dual-Booting Windows XP/Vista And Ubuntu 7.04

Post date: July 21, 2007, 00:07 Category: Desktop Views: 4287 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will teach you how to dual-boot between Windows XP/Vista and Ubuntu. This tutorial will be split up into two parts: Part one for people who have no operating system installed. Part two for people who have Windows XP/Vista installed and do not want to re-install Windows.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 2

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3738 Comments
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
OpenSUSE

Hacking OpenSUSE

Post date: December 3, 2005, 17:12 Category: System Views: 6785 Comments
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
Unix+clones

A web server in a shell script

Post date: March 14, 2006, 08:03 Category: Programming Views: 16515 Comments
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3636 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Fedora

How To Harden PHP5 With Suhosin On Fedora 7

Post date: July 25, 2007, 23:07 Category: Security Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to harden PHP5 with Suhosin on a Fedora 7 server. From the Suhosin project page: "Suhosin is an advanced protection system for PHP installations that was designed to protect servers and users from known and unknown flaws in PHP applications and the PHP core. Suhosin comes in two independent parts, that can be used separately or in combination. The first part is a small patch against the PHP core, that implements a few low-level protections against bufferoverflows or format string vulnerabilities and the second part is a powerful PHP extension that implements all the other protections."
CentOS

How To Harden PHP5 With Suhosin On CentOS 5.0

Post date: August 3, 2007, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 3782 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to harden PHP5 with Suhosin on a CentOS 5.0 server. From the Suhosin project page: "Suhosin is an advanced protection system for PHP installations that was designed to protect servers and users from known and unknown flaws in PHP applications and the PHP core. Suhosin comes in two independent parts, that can be used separately or in combination. The first part is a small patch against the PHP core, that implements a few low-level protections against bufferoverflows or format string vulnerabilities and the second part is a powerful PHP extension that implements all the other protections."
Debian

Restricting Users To SFTP Plus Setting Up Chrooted SSH/SFTP (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: September 6, 2011, 07:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5296 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to give users chrooted SSH and/or chrooted SFTP access on Debian Squeeze. With this setup, you can give your users shell access without having to fear that they can see your whole system. Your users will be jailed in a specific directory which they will not be able to break out of. I will also show how to restrict users to SFTP so that they cannot use SSH (this part is independent from the chroot part of this tutorial).
Ubuntu

How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux

Post date: May 14, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 4672 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux.The ext3 or third extended filesystem is a journalled file system that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. It is the default file system for many popular Linux distributions
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2742 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
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