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Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
OpenSUSE

Nessus Vulnerability Scanner in openSUSE

Post date: August 23, 2008, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 3305 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Nessus vulnerability scanner, is the world-leader in active scanners, featuring high speed discovery, configuration auditing, asset profiling, sensitive data discovery and vulnerability analysis of your security posture. Nessus scanners can be distributed throughout an entire enterprise, inside DMZs, and across physically separate networks. Nessus can also be used for ad-hoc scanning, daily scans, and quick-response audits.
Debian

Aggregating network interfaces

Post date: February 12, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 2991 Comments
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.
Linux

Measuring the Performance of HTTP Web Servers using ApacheBench (ab)

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4687 Comments
Tutorial quote: ApacheBench is a command line utility for measuring the performance of HTTP web servers, in particular the Apache HTTP Server. It was designed to give an idea of the performance that a given Apache installation can provide. In particular, it shows how many requests per second the server is capable of serving.
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 2736 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Linux

Check Your Mysql Server Performance with MySQLTuner

Post date: November 30, 2008, 20:11 Category: Software Views: 2744 Comments
Tutorial quote: MySQLTuner is a script written in Perl that will assist you with your MySQL configuration and make recommendations for increased performance and stability. Within seconds, it will display statistics about your MySQL installation and the areas where it can be improved.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 3818 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I

Post date: May 16, 2005, 23:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3689 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3370 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Fedora+Core

The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 3169 Comments
Tutorial quote: IPv6 is a key technology and a long-term solution to build scalable, reliable, manageable, secure, and high-performance IP networks. In this article, I demonstrated how to configure a Linux machine running Fedora Core 1 to support IPv6 and connect it to the IPv6 Internet using the Freenet6 service.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink