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Ubuntu

How to get ath5k working on Jaunty with Compat-wireless and a self-compiled kernel

Post date: May 27, 2009, 07:05 Category: Software Views: 3943 Comments
Tutorial quote: I used to have some trouble while setting up my Atheros PCI card on Ubuntu Linux 9.04. It worked natively on Ubuntu 8.04, where it was detected as ath0. I upgraded from 8.04 to 8.10 whereby I noticed my wireless PCI card didn’t work natively anymore. Someone suggested me to upgrade from 8.10 to 9.04 Jaunty, and I did that immediately. After the system upgrade I noticed again that my wireless device was gone in Ubuntu 9.04. When I ran iwconfig I didn’t see wlan0 or ath0 anymore.

Gentoo

Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To

Post date: April 13, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 4391 Comments
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server 2 On Ubuntu 10.10 (Kernel 2.6.35)

Post date: December 21, 2010, 13:12 Category: Installing Views: 3595 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
Gentoo

Fbsplash on gentoo

Post date: April 12, 2005, 05:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 4325 Comments
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
Linux

The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Programming Views: 4066 Comments
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5415 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
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