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Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 8.10 Server

Post date: March 10, 2009, 12:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4048 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 8.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.04 Server

Post date: May 10, 2011, 11:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2519 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.04 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.10 Server

Post date: November 27, 2011, 11:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 27319 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tools that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 10.10 Server

Post date: November 30, 2010, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2566 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 10.10 KVM server.
BSD

Firewalling with OpenBSD's PF packet filter

Post date: April 19, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 6492 Comments
Tutorial quote: PF operates in a world which consists of packets, protocols, connections and ports.

Based on where a packet is coming from or where it's going, which protocol, connection of port it is designated for, PF is able to determine where to lead the packet, or decide if it is to be let through at all.

It's equally possible to direct network traffic based on packet contents, usually referred to as application level filtering, but this is not the kind of thing PF does. We will come back later to some cases where PF will hand off these kinds of tasks to other software, but first let us deal with some basics.

We've already mentioned the firewall concept. One important feature of PF and similar software, perhaps the most important feature, is that it is able to identify and block traffic which is you do not want to let into your local network or let out to the world outside. At some point the term 'firewall' was coined.
Unix+clones

Using the GNU Privacy Guard

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 2408 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
FreeBSD

Installing ProFTPD

Post date: August 26, 2005, 13:08 Category: Network Views: 3294 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.
Gentoo

Hardened Gentoo PaX Quickstart

Post date: May 21, 2005, 21:05 Category: Security Views: 3535 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to setup PaX enabled kernel and take advantage of it.
SuSe

User-Mode Linux

Post date: December 8, 2005, 13:12 Category: Software Views: 3765 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
Gentoo

Monitoring all filesystem modifications

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Security Views: 3618 Comments
Tutorial quote: After loading this kernel module you can monitor all file system alterations by simply typing: cat /dev/fsysmon

It's original purpose was to feed a daemon with data but nevertheless I found it to be even more useful as a standalone project.
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