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Search results for Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel

Linux

Enabling S.M.A.R.T for SATA disks

Post date: October 10, 2005, 12:10 Category: System Views: 3328 Comments
Tutorial quote: This very short tutorial shows you how to enable S.M.A.R.T reporting for SATA disks on 2.6 linux kernel.
Linux

DOS Emulation Under Linux

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: Emulation Views: 3737 Comments
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Gentoo

Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat

Post date: January 29, 2006, 13:01 Category: Network Views: 12815 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Linux

NPTL vs. NPGT vs. LinuxThreads

Post date: April 24, 2005, 09:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3599 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ulrich Drepper recently offered some interesting benchmark results, comparing the time it takes to create and destroy threads with different threading models under various conditions. The tests were run using a 2.5.37 development kernel, comparing LinuxThreads, NGPT 2.0.2 and NPTL 0.1.
OpenBSD

Transparent proxying with squid and pf

Post date: May 17, 2005, 08:05 Category: Network Views: 12971 Comments
Tutorial quote: squid is a caching web proxy, it's set up between web browsers and servers, fetching documents from servers on behalf of browsers. It can accelerate web access by caching frequently requested pages and serving them from its cache. It can also be used to filter pop-up ads and malware or to enforce access control (which clients may request what pages based on different authentication methods).

Traditionally, the proxy is an optional component, and browsers are configured to actively use the proxy. Transparent proxying means forcing all web traffic through the proxy without the cooperation (or knowledge) of the clients. Once all browser connections pass through the proxy, outgoing connections to external hosts can be restricted to the proxy, and direct connections from local clients can be blocked.

The OpenBSD packet filter (pf) can be used to redirect connections based on various criteria, including source and destination addresses and ports. For instance, one can redirect all TCP connections with destination port 80 (HTTP) that arrive through an interface connected to local workstations to a squid proxy running on a different address and port.
Linux

Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Post date: February 17, 2009, 08:02 Category: Software Views: 3482 Comments
Tutorial quote: I guess you all know this: you are connected to your server with SSH and in the middle of compiling some software (e.g. a new kernel) or doing some other task which takes lots of time, and suddenly your connection drops for some reason, and you lose your labor. This can be very annoying, but fortunately there is a small utility called screen which lets you reattach to a previous session so that you can finish your task.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 7.10

Post date: November 1, 2007, 10:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4505 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to set up an Ubuntu Studio 7.10 desktop. The result is a fast, secure and extendable system with focus on multimedia creation - the real-time (RT) kernel is installed by default. It provides all you need for daily work and entertainment, incl. codecs, Flash, Adobe Reader, VMware, Skype, TrueType fonts, Cedega, and many more.
Nexenta

How To Build A Standalone File Server With Nexenta 3.0 Beta2

Post date: May 6, 2010, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 5315 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nexenta is a project developing a debian user-land for the OpenSolaris kernel. This provides all of the advantages of apt as a package respoitory (based on the Ubuntu LTS apt repository, currently using 8.04) as well as the advantages of the ZFS filesystem. In the resulting setup every user can have his/her own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol or NFS with read-/write access.
Linux

Enhancing kernel security with grsecurity

Post date: November 25, 2005, 21:11 Category: Security Views: 3570 Comments
Tutorial quote: Is your server as secure as it could be? Sure, you use a firewall, mandate strong passwords, and patch regularly. You even take a proactive approach by performing security audits with tools such as nmap and Nessus. Yet you may still be vulnerable to zero-day exploits and privilege escalation attacks. If these possibilities keep you awake at night, you're not alone. The sleepless folks with the grsecurity project have developed an easy-to-use set of security enhancements to help put your fears to rest.
Linux

screen: Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Post date: December 12, 2006, 20:12 Category: System Views: 3390 Comments
Tutorial quote: I guess you all know this: you are connected to your server with SSH and in the middle of compiling some software (e.g. a new kernel) or doing some other task which takes lots of time, and suddenly your connection drops for some reason, and you lose your labour. This can be very annoying, but fortunately there is a small utility called screen which lets you reattach to a previous session so that you can finish your task. This short tutorial shows how to use screen for just this purpose.
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