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Ubuntu

Recover Files from a Windows OS with PhotoRec via an Ubuntu Live CD

Post date: January 8, 2011, 23:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3103 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial guides you through recovering data from a crashed drive by using PhotoRec via n Ubuntu Live CD. It is written in plain language.
Linux

Easy peasy full system backup

Post date: August 12, 2008, 12:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3234 Comments
Tutorial quote: You know how when someone accidentally deletes their files or their hard drive crashes or some other apocalyptic event occurs, the first thing people ask is “where is your backup”? Of course, we’ve all seen it (*ahem* been there ). It’s a bit unintuitive, because backups have no equivalent in the real world. If you drive your car into a lake, there’s no way to get it back. But making backups is the single best way to prevent losing your stuff. So do it!
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2992 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3381 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Gentoo

Gentoo LVM2 installation

Post date: April 15, 2005, 04:04 Category: Installing Views: 2976 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide is based on an example with two IDE hard disks. It means that you will more than likely need to change the drive, partition names and partition sizes to match your own setup and needs.
Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Post date: September 11, 2007, 22:09 Category: Installing Views: 3256 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation. The resulting Ubuntu installation is a "real" Linux system, not just a virtual machine. Wubi makes it easy for Linux newbies to play around with Ubuntu.
Solaris

Restoring a Sun system using JumpStart technology

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Installing Views: 4023 Comments
Tutorial quote: If a server crash and the file systems are corrupted or totally destroyed, then the only way to recover the data is to restore from backups. If it is only user data that is corrupted, the task is in general simple, but if the system disk fails, then there is a little bit more work involved in order to to recover the system. This article explains how to backup Sun systems using ufsrestore over NFS, and how to use Sun's JumpStart technology to restore Sun servers and workstations over the network.
OSX

How To Backup Your Mac Intelligently

Post date: May 26, 2006, 07:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6097 Comments
Tutorial quote: I’m a paranoid person when it comes to backing up my files, but it took a hard drive crash of my own to make me realize how important backing up can be. Since then, I’ve gotten very good at making sure my data is secure. The setup I’m about to describe works for me. It’s based on how I prioritize my data and on the budget I’m willing to spend to keep everything safe. It’s not perfect for everyone, so take what I say with a grain of salt - an example of where to start and what’s possible.
OpenSUSE

Linux Kernel Magic SysRq keys in openSUSE for crash recovery

Post date: September 28, 2008, 17:09 Category: System Views: 3398 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux Kernel offers you something that allows you to recover your system from a crash or at the least lets you to perform a proper shutdown using the Magic SysRq Keys. The magic SysRq key is a select key combination in the Linux kernel which allows the user to perform various low level commands regardless of the system’s state using the SysRq key. It is often used to recover from freezes, or to reboot a computer without corrupting the filesystem.
Linux

Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer

Post date: June 24, 2005, 14:06 Category: System Views: 2652 Comments
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
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