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Linux

How to install Linux on Windows using VirtualBox

Post date: August 12, 2008, 14:08 Category: Installing Views: 3102 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Linux and specifically Ubuntu Linux on Windows XP using SUN's VirtualBox. VirtualBox creates a virtual hard drive in which you can install another guest Operating System (Ubuntu Linux) which you can run along with your host Operating System (Windows XP). This way you can try Linux without being afraid of losing your Windows files.
Debian

Boot Debian from an external firewire drive on PowerPc Mac

Post date: December 14, 2005, 19:12 Category: Installing Views: 2601 Comments
Tutorial quote: Messing with a boot process is a delicate matter even on a Mac. Note that the Debian installer will fail at some point during the procedure.
I offer no warranty and assume no responsibility for whatever loss or damage might be caused to your hardware, software or data.
There are other ways to boot Linux from an external firewire drive documented elsewhere on the net. See the Resources section.

Adding or removing peripherals like usb keys, digital cameras, other external HDs, cdroms etc, or installing/removing devfs, udev, and similar stuff might alter the way Linux sees the firewire drive, i suggest becoming familiar with supplying boot options to yaboot during the boot process. See Man pages of yaboot and yaboot.conf.
Fedora

Using iSCSI On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: May 28, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3981 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 9.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: July 7, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 4873 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 9.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 10.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: August 17, 2010, 11:08 Category: Installing Views: 4792 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 10.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6089 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
Debian

Using iSCSI On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 12, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3594 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 3774 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
Linux

How to restore deleted file on ext2

Post date: December 15, 2006, 19:12 Category: System Views: 3031 Comments
Tutorial quote: This text describes the steps needed do recover the data of a file that was recently deleted.
Fedora

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: June 2, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 3420 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
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