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Search results for Recover a dead hard drive using dd

Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 15, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3435 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Recover your deleted jpeg pictures from filesystem or camera memory card - recoverjpeg

Post date: October 10, 2010, 05:10 Category: Desktop Views: 2323 Comments
Tutorial quote: Deleted or lost files can usually be recovered from failed or formatted drives and partitions, CD-ROMs and memory cards using the free software available in the Ubuntu repositories. The data is recoverable because the information is not immediately removed from the disk.
Gentoo

Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat

Post date: January 29, 2006, 13:01 Category: Network Views: 11224 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Gentoo

Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick

Post date: June 20, 2005, 04:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4894 Comments
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
Linux

shred - Securely delete files in Linux

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Security Views: 4139 Comments
Tutorial quote: In case you want to delete some confidential data from your computer just to make sure that it is no longer accessible to anyone, then do not delete the file using the regular rm command because there will still remain a chance that someone might use a software to recover your deleted data before the specific storage area is overwritten by new data. The proper way to permanently dispose of such data in Linux is the shred command.
Unix+clones

Version control for non-programmers with Subversion

Post date: June 9, 2005, 04:06 Category: Software Views: 2915 Comments
Tutorial quote: Imagine a utility that lets you make an annotated backup of any of your project files with the click of a mouse or a single command. It would let you review the history of your backups and recover any version you wished. And it would integrate with your file browser and would keep track of files that have changed since your last backup. The utility exists -- Subversion, and its companion program TortoiseSVN, can help you safely manage your files as you work with them.
Ubuntu

A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk)!

Post date: June 1, 2008, 21:06 Category: Software Views: 4219 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will explain A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk).I was reading How to install Ubuntu Linux from USB Stick posted a while ago, and found it to be quite some work to get Ubuntu working on a USB stick. Besides, having to prepare your USB device, creating a separate partition on it which will be more or less “useless” after the installation, giving up 750MB of space?

Linux

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

Post date: June 19, 2007, 02:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3047 Comments
Tutorial quote: Subversion is a free/open-source version control system. That is, Subversion manages files and directories over time. A tree of files is placed into a central repository. The repository is much like an ordinary file server, except that it remembers every change ever made to your files and directories. This allows you to recover older versions of your data, or examine the history of how your data changed. In this regard, many people think of a version control system as a sort of time machine.
Linux

How to create a virtual cd/dvd drive in Linux

Post date: January 13, 2009, 13:01 Category: Software Views: 3193 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a guide that explains how to create a virtual cd/dvd in Linux using the CLI, furius ISO Mount and gCDemu.
NetBSD

How to install NetBSD from an USB Memory Stick

Post date: December 10, 2007, 04:12 Category: Installing Views: 8928 Comments
Tutorial quote: This describes how to install NetBSD (i386/amd64) using a Memory Stick instead of a CD-ROM Drive.
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