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Linux+Mint

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 10 (Julia)

Post date: November 18, 2010, 13:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4688 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 10 (Julia) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 10 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 10.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.
Linux+Mint

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 9 (Isadora)

Post date: May 19, 2010, 15:05 Category: Desktop Views: 7264 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 9 (Isadora) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 9 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 10.04 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.
Linux+Mint

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 8 (Helena)

Post date: December 1, 2009, 14:12 Category: Desktop Views: 5350 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 8 (Helena) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 8 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 9.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.
Ubuntu

Simple Package management with Synaptic Package Manager

Post date: December 5, 2006, 22:12 Category: System Views: 4373 Comments
Tutorial quote: Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. Synaptic uses the GTK graphic libraries . So, if you are using GNOME on your debian-based distro you will probably have Synaptic installed as well. Synaptic is a graphical package management program for apt. It provides the same features as the apt-get command line utility with a GUI front-end based on Gtk+.
Ubuntu

Flip - Convert text file line endings between Unix and DOS formats

Post date: March 2, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 3068 Comments
Tutorial quote: This program converts line endings of text files between MS-DOS and **IX formats. It detects binary files in a nearly foolproof way and leaves them alone unless you override this. It will also leave files alone that are already in the right format and preserves file timestamps.User interrupts are handled gracefully and no garbage or corrupted files left behind. ‘flip’ does not convert files to a different character set, and it can not handle Apple Macintosh line endings (CR only). For that (and more), you can use the ‘recode’ program (package ‘recode’).

Linux

How To Manage An iPod From A Linux Desktop With gtkpod

Post date: August 5, 2007, 23:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3644 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can use an iPod on a Linux desktop with gtkpod (a graphical user interface for Apple's iPod). It covers how you can upload MP3 files from your desktop to your iPod, download MP3 files from your iPod to your desktop, how you can delete files on the iPod, and how you can create and modify playlists. Normally, Apple's iTunes software is needed to manage an iPod, but iTunes is not available for Linux. Fortunately, there are Linux alternatives such as gtkpod that can handle the task.
Linux+Mint

Installation Guide: Linux Mint 4.0 Daryna (a.k.a. The Perfect Desktop)

Post date: November 22, 2007, 11:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4804 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 4.0 (Daryna) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 4.0 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 7.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.
Debian

Make Browsers Cache Static Files With mod_expires On Apache2 (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: March 10, 2011, 11:03 Category: Installing Views: 3066 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can configure Apache2 to set the Expires HTTP header and the max-age directive of the Cache-Control HTTP header of static files (such as images, CSS and Javascript files) to a date in the future so that these files will be cached by your visitors' browsers. This saves bandwidth and makes your web site appear faster (if a user visits your site for a second time, static files will be fetched from the browser cache). This tutorial was written for Debian Squeeze.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: December 7, 2007, 06:12 Category: Emulation Views: 5705 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3953 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
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