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Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3181 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Debian

Creating desktop notifications

Post date: June 21, 2006, 10:06 Category: Programming Views: 3151 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are several times when you'll be writing a script, or a program, which needs to communicate with the desktop user and here we'll look at two of the more modern approaches.
Ubuntu

Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part I

Post date: September 20, 2006, 22:09 Category: Network Views: 7172 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial guides user on how to install and configure FireHOL, a Linux-based firewall.
Unix+clones

Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen

Post date: August 9, 2005, 19:08 Category: Network Views: 2798 Comments
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
Unix+clones

Getting started with SSH

Post date: February 11, 2006, 04:02 Category: Network Views: 2804 Comments
Tutorial quote: The following sections hope to provide enough information to setup a user new to ssh with the appropriate files necessary for accessing remote hosts in a secure manner.
SuSe

User-Mode Linux

Post date: December 8, 2005, 13:12 Category: Software Views: 3791 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
Unix+clones

Classic AmigaOS Emulation - A Guide for WinUAE

Post date: June 12, 2005, 23:06 Category: Emulation Views: 3665 Comments
Tutorial quote: WinUAE has reached a "v1.0 public"-state (!) and includes many improvements including OpenGL/DirectX display filters (for enhancing graphic output), Catweasel support (hardware for reading classic Amiga formatted diskettes with today's diskdrives) and an overall more cleanly designed user interface. For most people who are unfamiliar with AmigaOS and the use of Amiga emulators, setting up a usable AmigaOS emulation environment can be a daunting task. I have often heard of even veteran computing professionals feeling like complete computing newbees again when being confronted with all the Amiga jargon floating around on Amiga forums. With this article I intend to help provide information and pointers to resources for getting familiar with classic Amiga emulation while focussing on the freely available WinUAE emulator for the Windows platform. With this guide setting up an advanced classic emulation environment shoulld be possible for any PC user.

This article also includes many WinUAE screenshots, videos and information on acquiring and using freely available software.
Debian

Howto install pureftpd on a debian machine

Post date: April 10, 2006, 02:04 Category: Software Views: 2930 Comments
Tutorial quote: The target of this tutorial is to have a successful installation of the ftp-daemon pureftpd working with virtual user accounts. You should already know about installing pureftpd.
Fedora

Upgrade Fedora 9 with Fedora 10

Post date: December 5, 2008, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 2801 Comments
Tutorial quote: Fedora 10 codenamed "Cambridge" has been released. This new version of the community oriented, Red Hat backed Linux distribution comes with new features which enhance the end user experience.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3110 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink