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OpenSUSE

OpenVAS - Opensource Vulnerability Assessment Scanner

Post date: August 24, 2008, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 10389 Comments
Tutorial quote: OpenVAS, Open Bulnerability Assessment Server is a free opensource vulnerability assessment software released under GNU GPL lincese. OpenVAS is a fork of Nessus Vulnerability assessment software. Similar to the Plugin sets in Nessus, OpenVAS provides free Network Vulnerability Tests plugins that can be updated regularly.
Mandriva

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1)

Post date: May 8, 2007, 23:05 Category: Desktop Views: 3732 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
gOS

The Perfect Desktop - gOS Rocket G 2.0 (GNOME)

Post date: April 24, 2008, 08:04 Category: Desktop Views: 6320 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a gOS Rocket G 2.0 (GNOME) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. gOS is a lightweight Linux distribution, based on Ubuntu 7.10, that comes with Google Apps and some other Web 2.0 applications; gOS Rocket G 2.0 uses the GNOME desktop.
Unix+clones

Enhance boot-time security with GRUB passwords

Post date: April 26, 2006, 13:04 Category: Security Views: 3220 Comments
Tutorial quote: The security of data files on your computer is at risk, and not just because you are connected to the Internet. Anyone with physical access to your machine can bypass all passwords to gain entry to your hard disk with one simple command given to the bootloader. Fortunately, the popular GRand Unified Bootloader (GRUB) is equipped with security features to prevent such an 'attack.' It can password protect each entry of your boot menu.
Fedora+Core

The Perfect Desktop - Part 1: Fedora Core 6

Post date: February 22, 2007, 19:02 Category: Desktop Views: 6926 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the first of a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Fedora Core 6 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Fedora+Core

Enhancing Apache with mod_security

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Security Views: 3019 Comments
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Mandriva

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On Mandriva 2010.1 Spring

Post date: January 18, 2011, 13:01 Category: Installing Views: 3846 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on Mandriva 2010.1 Spring. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.
Debian

The Perfect Desktop - Debian Etch (Debian 4.0)

Post date: April 29, 2007, 22:04 Category: Desktop Views: 3162 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. In this tutorial I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Debian Etch in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that runs also on older hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn

Post date: May 6, 2007, 22:05 Category: Desktop Views: 4082 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial shows people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that runs also on older hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 3: How To Get Started

Post date: April 25, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 2807 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the previous two articles in this series, we examined some of the whys and whats of building Linux clusters. This article concludes our series by concentrating on the hows of cluster building. We've seen that a clustered approach to certain computing solutions can save lots of money in hardware and support costs. Now our job is to produce a method of building clusters that's repeatable and predictable—we don't want to give back our hard-won savings in project cost overruns.
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