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Ubuntu

NFS Server and Client Configuration in Ubuntu

Post date: May 7, 2007, 06:05 Category: Network Views: 7261 Comments
Tutorial quote: NFS was developed at a time when we weren’t able to share our drives like we are able to today - in the Windows environment. It offers the ability to share the hard disk space of a big server with many smaller clients. Again, this is a client/server environment. While this seems like a standard service to offer, it was not always like this. In the past, clients and servers were unable to share their disk space.
Mandriva

The Perfect Desktop - Part 2: Mandriva Free 2007

Post date: February 27, 2007, 18:02 Category: Desktop Views: 4266 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the second in a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Mandriva Free 2007 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Ubuntu

Apt-Cacher-NG - HTTP download proxy for software packages

Post date: February 24, 2009, 07:02 Category: System Views: 4466 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apt-Cacher-ng is a software package that keeps a cache, on the disk, of Debian/Ubuntu Packages and Release files.When an apt-get like client issues a request for a file, Apt-Cacher intercepts it and if the file is already cached it serves it to the client immediately, otherwise it fetches the file from the Internet, saves it on the cache, and then serves it to the client. This means that several Debian machines can be upgraded but each package need to be downloaded only once.
OpenSUSE

rsnapshot - Local/Remote Filesystem backups utility in openSUSE

Post date: October 6, 2008, 21:10 Category: System Views: 4554 Comments
Tutorial quote: rsnapshot is a filesystem backup utility based on rsync. Using rsnapshot, it is possible to take snapshots of your filesystems at different points in time. Using hard links, rsnapshot creates the illusion of multiple full backups, while only taking up the space of one full backup plus differences. When coupled with ssh, it is possible to take snapshots of remote filesystems as well.
Unix+clones

The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 3272 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 3320 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Linux+Mint

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint Debian 201009

Post date: November 4, 2010, 12:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4255 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint Debian 201009 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. While the "normal" Linux Mint editions are based on Ubuntu, Linux Mint Debian 201009 is a Linux distribution based on Debian Squeeze (testing); its aim is to look identical to the main edition and to provide the same functionality while using Debian as a base.
BSD

Firewalling with OpenBSD's PF packet filter

Post date: April 19, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 7582 Comments
Tutorial quote: PF operates in a world which consists of packets, protocols, connections and ports.

Based on where a packet is coming from or where it's going, which protocol, connection of port it is designated for, PF is able to determine where to lead the packet, or decide if it is to be let through at all.

It's equally possible to direct network traffic based on packet contents, usually referred to as application level filtering, but this is not the kind of thing PF does. We will come back later to some cases where PF will hand off these kinds of tasks to other software, but first let us deal with some basics.

We've already mentioned the firewall concept. One important feature of PF and similar software, perhaps the most important feature, is that it is able to identify and block traffic which is you do not want to let into your local network or let out to the world outside. At some point the term 'firewall' was coined.
Linux

Gnu Queue: Linux Clustering Made Easy

Post date: December 22, 2005, 19:12 Category: System Views: 3572 Comments
Tutorial quote: GNU Queue makes it easy to cluster Linux workstations. If you already know how to control jobs running on your local machine, you already know how to control remote jobs using GNU Queue. You don't even need special privileges to install and run GNU Queue on your cluster--anyone can do it. Once you've discovered how incredibly easy it is to cluster Linux environments with GNU Queue, you'll wonder why organizations continue to spend so much money on comparatively hard-to-cluster Windows NT environments.
Unix+clones

Hide your folders in KDE

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: Desktop Views: 3632 Comments
Tutorial quote: Want to keep your MP3s away from your boss’ or big brother’s view? Of course, in Linux anything that starts with a period is “suppose” to be hidden; but all we have to do is type “ls -A” or turn on the viewing of hidden files in KDE…not too hard. Basically what we can do is set a transparent PNG as our folder icon, and rename our folder with a ” “(space). This will actually keep the previous name of the folder.Also we will keep anyone out of the folder that doesn’t know Linux commands, and doesn’t know exactly where we have placed the icon. This works GREAT for the desktop.
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