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Search results for Replacing A Failed Hard Drive In A Software RAID1 Array

Solaris

Installing Solaris 8 x86

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Installing Views: 3277 Comments
Tutorial quote: Solaris x86 can picky when it comes to hardware. It may not work on hardware that's not listed in the HCL (Hardware Compatibility List). My older Pentium system's motherboard was OK, and it found the hard-drive I had connected to the primary IDE channel (on the motherboard) but it wouldn't recognize the CD-ROM drive even though it was connected to the secondary IDE channel on the motherboard. (I had better luck on a system where the CD-ROM drive was connected as the slave on the primary IDE channel. I prefer to keep the CD-ROM drive off the hard-drive channel but if all else fails you can try this to see if it works. :)
Ubuntu

NTFS Disk Recovery

Post date: February 12, 2010, 12:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3001 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mary, the daughter of a friend is in college: her Windows XP laptop constantly reboots and, we suspect, has a bad hard drive. The system will boot a live CD (Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Desktop), and data on the hard drive can be read. During boot, the live CD identifies disk errors and tries unsuccessfully to repair them.
Linux

Storing Files/Directories In Memory With tmpfs

Post date: December 9, 2008, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2905 Comments
Tutorial quote: You probably know that reading from RAM is a lot of faster than reading files from the hard drive, and reduces your disk I/O. This article shows how you can store files and directories in memory instead of on the hard drive with the help of tmpfs (a file system for creating memory devices). This is ideal for file caches and other temporary data (such as PHP's session files if you are using session.save_handler = files) because the data is lost when you power down or reboot the system.
Linux

HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Post date: April 2, 2006, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2721 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently ran into the problem of not having enough hard drive space on my slackware linux laptop, but was lucky enough to have a much bigger drive sitting around from before and wanted a way to perform a hassle free seamless upgrade. i had this idea and it worked pretty well so i thought i would share it since i think it's pretty cool and only requires the use of two tools that should be included with all distributions.
Linux

Create an Image of a Crashed Hard Drive with ddrescue and mount it in Windows

Post date: January 8, 2011, 23:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4153 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is written for those wanting to use ddrescue via live cd to create an image of drive and later recover it in Windows. The tutorial uses plain language.
OSX

Recover a dead hard drive using dd

Post date: October 23, 2006, 03:10 Category: System Views: 15355 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Unix program dd is a disk copying util that you can use at the command line in order to make a disk image. It makes a bit-by-bit copy of the drive it's copying, caring nothing about filesystem type, files, or anything else. It's a great way to workaround the need for Norton Ghost.

Normally, in order to make a disk image, the disk you're copying from has to be able to spin up and talk -- in other words, it's OK to make a copy if the disk is healthy. But what happens when your disk is becoming a doorstop? As long as it continues to spin, even with physical damage on the drive, dd and Mac OS X will get you out of the fire.
Linux

Easy peasy full system backup

Post date: August 12, 2008, 12:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3166 Comments
Tutorial quote: You know how when someone accidentally deletes their files or their hard drive crashes or some other apocalyptic event occurs, the first thing people ask is “where is your backup”? Of course, we’ve all seen it (*ahem* been there ). It’s a bit unintuitive, because backups have no equivalent in the real world. If you drive your car into a lake, there’s no way to get it back. But making backups is the single best way to prevent losing your stuff. So do it!
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2918 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Ubuntu

Prepping Ubuntu for Everyday Use

Post date: June 2, 2006, 07:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3745 Comments
Tutorial quote: Below are over 25 tips that will let you tweak and personalize the latest Ubuntu release so that it's perfect. Think of it as polishing the diamond.

In the tips I explain some simple stuff, such as replacing that gloomy wallpaper with something prettier, to more essential stuff, such as enabling all the Ubuntu software repositories so that you get the fullest choice of software. You'll also learn how to configure proprietary 3D graphics drivers.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3315 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
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