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Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 9.04

Post date: July 27, 2009, 10:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2039 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 2759 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Linux

How to install Linux on Windows using VirtualBox

Post date: August 12, 2008, 14:08 Category: Installing Views: 3076 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Linux and specifically Ubuntu Linux on Windows XP using SUN's VirtualBox. VirtualBox creates a virtual hard drive in which you can install another guest Operating System (Ubuntu Linux) which you can run along with your host Operating System (Windows XP). This way you can try Linux without being afraid of losing your Windows files.
Fedora

Using iSCSI On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: May 28, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3945 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 9.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: July 7, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 4844 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 9.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 10.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: August 17, 2010, 11:08 Category: Installing Views: 4758 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 10.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Debian

Using Samba on Debian Linux

Post date: February 3, 2006, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 3676 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article will show you how to install Samba 3.X on Debian Linux 3.1 (Sarge) and make it authenticate against a Windows server running Active Directory. It is not intended on replacing the actual official Samba 3 manual - which is a quite good read anyway.
Debian

Using iSCSI On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 12, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3561 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 3744 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 4771 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink