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Debian

Upgrading Debian Etch (Stable) to Lenny (Testing)

Post date: October 3, 2008, 03:10 Category: System Views: 2807 Comments
Tutorial quote: Lenny is updated everyday with the most recent software available, however the software may not be stable which is what Debian is really all about. However if like me you can’t stand the thought of having outdated software, heres how to upgrade.
SuSe

A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: System Views: 4100 Comments
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Ubuntu

Recover Files from a Windows OS with PhotoRec via an Ubuntu Live CD

Post date: January 8, 2011, 23:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3018 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial guides you through recovering data from a crashed drive by using PhotoRec via n Ubuntu Live CD. It is written in plain language.
Debian

Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2421 Comments
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Linux

How to create a virtual cd/dvd drive in Linux

Post date: January 13, 2009, 13:01 Category: Software Views: 3192 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a guide that explains how to create a virtual cd/dvd in Linux using the CLI, furius ISO Mount and gCDemu.
NetBSD

How to install NetBSD from an USB Memory Stick

Post date: December 10, 2007, 04:12 Category: Installing Views: 8927 Comments
Tutorial quote: This describes how to install NetBSD (i386/amd64) using a Memory Stick instead of a CD-ROM Drive.
Linux

Taking backup using tar command in linux and unix

Post date: April 18, 2006, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 2199 Comments
Tutorial quote: The tar backup program is an archiving program designed to store and extract files from an archive file known as a tarfile. A tarfile may be made on a tape drive; however, it is also common to write a tarfile to a normal file.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2356 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Ubuntu

Multimedia Support in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

Post date: November 2, 2008, 05:11 Category: Multimedia Views: 3256 Comments
Tutorial quote: Often the case (and especially) when it comes out a new version of Ubuntu, that repositories from which we tend to download software are highly saturated. If you want to download and install the software more quickly, we will have to modify the list of repositories.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2683 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
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