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Search results for Rescuing systems using the Debian snapshot server

Debian

Rescuing systems using the Debian snapshot server

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: System Views: 5211 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the unofficial Debian project resources which doesn't get the attention it deserves is the Debian Snapshot site. The site contains a mirror of old Debian packages, which can be very useful for system recovery.

In most normal cases you won't ever need to use it, unless you're wanting to compare two different package versions to see changes, or do other non-standard things. However when you do need to use it you'll learn what a big lifesaver it is!

The biggest use for the site, for me, has been for recovering from broken package updates. Whilst these are rare in the Debian Stable and Testing releases they can be an issue when running Debian unstable.
Unix+clones

Create Incremental Snapshot-style Backups With rSync And SSH

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Network Views: 3140 Comments
Tutorial quote: As neither human nor computers are perfect (humans err / computers may fail) it is quite obvious that a good backup system will prevent from too much damage once the computer may go down. This could be either because the harddrive is failing or because of hackers or because you accidentally deleted something important.

In this tutorial I will show you how to automate backups automatically in an incremental snapshot-style way by using rSync.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3311 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
NetBSD

Installling NetBSD: Tales of Rescuing Old Hardware

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Hardware Views: 6314 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tutorial explains how to install NetBSD on old Toshiba T2130CS using COM port.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 2743 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 9.04

Post date: July 27, 2009, 10:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2020 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3203 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3004 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Debian

Monitoring Multiple Systems With munin (Debian Etch)

Post date: March 6, 2008, 13:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5679 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this article I will describe how you can monitor multiple systems with munin. munin produces nifty little graphics about nearly every aspect of your server (load average, memory usage, CPU usage, MySQL throughput, eth0 traffic, etc.) without much configuration. I will install the munin client on all systems that are to be monitored (including the munin server itself); the munin clients will then report to the munin server.
Debian

Cloning Linux Systems With CloneZilla Server Edition (CloneZilla SE)

Post date: January 22, 2009, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 30951 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can clone Linux systems with CloneZilla SE. This is useful for copying one Linux installation to multiple computers without losing much time, e.g. in a classroom, or also for creating an image-based backup of a system. I will install CloneZilla SE on a Debian Etch server in this tutorial. The systems that you want to clone can use whatever Linux distribution you prefer.
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