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Debian

Installing Zabbix (Server And Agent) On Debian Etch

Post date: July 11, 2007, 23:07 Category: Installing Views: 4173 Comments
Tutorial quote: Zabbix is a solution for monitoring applications, networks, and servers. With Zabbix, you can monitor multiple servers at a time, using a Zabbix server that comes with a web interface (that is used to configure Zabbix and holds the graphs of your systems) and Zabbix agents that are installed on the systems to be monitored. The Zabbix agents deliver the desired data to the Zabbix server. This tutorial shows how you can install the Zabbix server and agent on a Debian Etch system.
Debian

How To Install VMware Server On Debian 4.0 (Etch)

Post date: April 24, 2007, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3543 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.2) on a Debian Etch system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Debian Etch (4.0) as the host operating system.
Fedora

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Post date: March 8, 2009, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 3920 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V). Hardware virtualization allows you to install unmodified guest systems (in contrast to paravirtualization where the guest kernel needs to be modified); that way you cannot only virtualize OpenSource operating systems like Linux and BSD, but also closed-source operating systems like Windows where you cannot modify the kernel.
Debian

Automatix2 Setup in Debian Etch

Post date: May 7, 2007, 06:05 Category: Installing Views: 2829 Comments
Tutorial quote: Automatix is a graphical interface for automating the installation of the most commonly requested applications in Debian based Linux operating systems.
Debian

Upgrade multiple debian systems with Approx

Post date: June 15, 2009, 06:06 Category: System Views: 4416 Comments
Tutorial quote: Approx is an HTTP-based Debian archive server. It fetches packages from remote repositories on demand, and caches them for local use.Approx saves time and network bandwidth if you need to install or upgrade Debian software for a number of machines on a local network.
Debian

Upgrade Debian Lenny To Squeeze In A Few Simple Steps

Post date: February 8, 2011, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 2343 Comments
Tutorial quote: One rather old laptop and one server were the test objects for this howto. Both systems do not have any RAID devices and use a simple partition scheme from a default basic Lenny install. If your setup deviates much from this, it's highly recommended to read all details of the Debian Release Notes before you continue. Be warned. All commands are run as root and Debian recommends to use apt-get for the Squeeze upgrade process.
Debian

Virtualization With Xen 3.3.1 On Debian Etch

Post date: February 12, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 2598 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 3.3.1 on a Debian Etch (4.0) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2669 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Setup an IPv6 Masquerade Box Under Debian Through IPv4

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 2633 Comments
Tutorial quote: Configuring IPv6 (over IPv4) under Debian, quite frankly, couldn't be easier. I had a somewhat difficult time in setting it up myself, but that was only because the guides I'd seen on the WWW were designed for operating systems such as FreeBSD. Thus, I have decided to write this document to promote IPv6, and to relieve the frustration of those looking for a no-fuss way to quickly configure IPv6 under Debian.
Debian

Installing new Debian systems with debootstrap

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Installing Views: 3161 Comments
Tutorial quote: When it comes to installing new installations of Debian GNU/Linux there is one tool which should not be ignored. Whether you're dealing with a real system, or a virtualised one, the debootstrap tool is ideal for quickly installing new Debian environments.

Put simply the debootstrap package allows you to install a fresh copy of Debian GNU/Linux into a directory. This new installation will have all the basic packages and binaries which you'd expect to be present
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