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Debian

How To Create A Debian Wheezy (Testing) OpenVZ Template

Post date: September 15, 2011, 08:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4358 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to create an OpenVZ template for Debian Wheezy (Debian Testing) that you can use to create virtual Debian Wheezy machines under OpenVZ. I searched for a Debian Wheezy OpenVZ template, but couldn't find one, that's why I decided to create it myself. This guide can also be used for creating Debian Lenny templates and templates for recent Ubuntu versions.
Debian

Giving users a home directory automatically

Post date: June 16, 2006, 21:06 Category: System Views: 2872 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you are using LDAP or NIS to manage users you might discover users having problems because they don't have a home directory on each machine they can connect to. Thankfully there is a simple solution for creating home directories upon demand for users.

The Pluggable Authentication Modules library, or PAM, is a collection of shared libraries which control how users login to systems. There are a number of modules installed which can be used to restrict user access to systems in different ways. There are also several utility modules which can be used to customise login behaviour.
Debian

Installation Of PlaySMS And SMS Server Tools 3 On Debian Server

Post date: February 24, 2011, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3656 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will show you how you can set up an SMS server on Debian with playsms and smstools. In my example I have used an old Nokia 5140i with a USB datacable.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Post date: June 10, 2007, 22:06 Category: Installing Views: 4307 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 4003 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 2490 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Debian

Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable

Post date: February 3, 2006, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 3646 Comments
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
Linux

NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 2871 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 2772 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Unix+clones

Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3507 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
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