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RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6034 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
Ubuntu

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 14, 2010, 01:01 Category: Installing Views: 2499 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Ubuntu 9.10) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Fedora

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Fedora 12

Post date: March 4, 2010, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 2625 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Fedora 12) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Fedora 12 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
CentOS

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On CentOS 5.4

Post date: April 1, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 3818 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running CentOS 5.4) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (CentOS 5.4 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Solaris

Installing Postfix and Dovecot Under Opensolaris

Post date: August 17, 2009, 23:08 Category: Installing Views: 4857 Comments
Tutorial quote: Replace sendmail with this easy to install and configure system. Postfix and Dovecot provide a powerful and easy to manage mail system enabling SMTP, IMAP, and POP3. Also included is integration of the powerful spam killer Spamassassin.
SGI

Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network

Post date: May 21, 2005, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 5842 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Debian

How to Install Latest Wine in debian Etch

Post date: December 22, 2008, 07:12 Category: Software Views: 2917 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wine makes it possible to run Windows programs alongside any Unix-like operating system,particularly Linux. At its heart, Wine is an implementation of the Windows Application
Programing Interface (API) library, acting as a bridge between the Windows program and Linux.Think of Wine as a compatibility layer, when a Windows program tries to perform a function that Linux doesn’t normally understand, Wine will translate that program’s instruction into one supported by the system. For example, if a program asks the system to create a Windows pushbutton or text-edit field, Wine will convert that instruction into its Linux equivalent in the form of a command to the window manager using the standard X11 protocol.
Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Post date: September 11, 2007, 22:09 Category: Installing Views: 3195 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation. The resulting Ubuntu installation is a "real" Linux system, not just a virtual machine. Wubi makes it easy for Linux newbies to play around with Ubuntu.
Linux

Comprehensive Linux System Services List: Explanation and Recommendation

Post date: December 17, 2007, 06:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3525 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux services are basically programs that start at boot time to provide certain features and services (Apache, the web server for example). After installation, every Linux distribution provides a list of enabled services. However, you might not need some of these services or you might need others that are not enabled by default. Having only the services you need running will make your system faster, more stable and secure. So the first thing you need to do after installing a Linux distribution is to manually edit the list of enabled services. Unfortunately, some services don’t provide a description, others provide a description that’s not understandable so you might end-up disabling a vital system service just because you didn’t know what it did and you thought you didn’t need it.
Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server 2 On An Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Post date: September 30, 2008, 10:09 Category: Installing Views: 3335 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
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