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Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2417 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3684 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Debian

Monitoring your filesystem for unauthorised change

Post date: July 15, 2006, 05:07 Category: Security Views: 2902 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're running a stable server and are worried about an intruder modifying your system binaries to install new corrupted versions you should be using a filesystem integrity checker.
Gentoo

Monitoring all filesystem modifications

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Security Views: 3643 Comments
Tutorial quote: After loading this kernel module you can monitor all file system alterations by simply typing: cat /dev/fsysmon

It's original purpose was to feed a daemon with data but nevertheless I found it to be even more useful as a standalone project.
Linux

How to catch Linux system intruders

Post date: September 22, 2008, 13:09 Category: Security Views: 4167 Comments
Tutorial quote: Secure your Linux box by locking it down and posting a guard to watch for intruders.
Ubuntu

Setting up Xen 3.0 from binaries in Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)

Post date: June 16, 2006, 07:06 Category: Software Views: 3291 Comments
Tutorial quote: This particular way of installing and configuring Xen is just the path of least resistance for me. There are many other possible ways of configuring the system.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3050 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
NetBSD

How to set up a DHCP Server

Post date: June 22, 2006, 21:06 Category: Network Views: 6160 Comments
Tutorial quote: Setting up a DHCP Server for your Home or Company Network is pretty simple with NetBSD. You don't need to install any Software, because everything you need, is part of the base system.
Debian

BackupPC Installation And Configuration

Post date: June 19, 2006, 15:06 Category: Software Views: 3143 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackupPC is a high-performance, enterprise-grade system for backing up Linux and WinXX PCs and laptops to a server's disk. BackupPC is highly configurable and easy to install and maintain.
Ubuntu

Watching Live-TV On Your Ubuntu Desktop With Zattoo

Post date: May 18, 2008, 11:05 Category: Desktop Views: 9121 Comments
Tutorial quote: Zattoo has developed a software program that allows you to watch TV on your computer. All you need is a broadband connection and a current operating system (Windows XP or Vista, Mac OS X, or Linux). The service is legal and free of charge.

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