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CentOS

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS (CentOS 5.4)

Post date: March 23, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 4282 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running CentOS 5.4) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (CentOS 5.4 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Mandriva

Distributed Replicated Storage Across 4 Nodes With GlusterFS On Mandriva 2010.0

Post date: April 20, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 5034 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Mandriva 2010.0) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Mandriva 2010.0 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Debian

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 30, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4505 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Debian

Setting Up A Highly Available NFS Server

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 6972 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to set up a highly available NFS server that can be used as storage solution for other high-availability services like, for example, a cluster of web servers that are being loadbalanced. If you have a web server cluster with two or more nodes that serve the same web site(s), than these nodes must access the same pool of data so that every node serves the same data, no matter if the loadbalancer directs the user to node 1 or node n. This can be achieved with an NFS share on an NFS server that all web server nodes (the NFS clients) can access.

As we do not want the NFS server to become another "Single Point of Failure", we have to make it highly available. In fact, in this tutorial I will create two NFS servers that mirror their data to each other in realtime using DRBD and that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one NFS server fails, the other takes over silently. To the outside (e.g. the web server nodes) these two NFS servers will appear as a single NFS server.

In this setup I will use Debian Sarge (3.1) for the two NFS servers as well as for the NFS client (which represents a node of the web server cluster).
Unix+clones

Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3191 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3806 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
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