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Search results for Running ISPConfig On Port 80 Using Apache's Reverse Proxy Feature (Debian Etch)

Debian

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Debian Etch

Post date: April 27, 2007, 23:04 Category: Installing Views: 3496 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 16, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 5536 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Lenny

Post date: July 14, 2009, 09:07 Category: Installing Views: 7697 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Filtering PDF-/XLS-/Image-Spam With ClamAV (And ISPConfig) On Debian/Ubuntu

Post date: July 24, 2007, 02:07 Category: Security Views: 4200 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is currently a lot of spam where the spam information is attached as .pdf or .xls files, sometime also hidden inside a .zip file. While these spam mails are not easy to catch with e.g. SpamAssassin or a Bayes filter, the ClamAV virus scanner can catch them easily when it is fed with the correct signatures as ClamAV is built to scan mail attachments.
Debian

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 25, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4010 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 3139 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
CentOS

CentOS 4.6 Server Setup: LAMP, Email, DNS, FTP, ISPConfig

Post date: January 10, 2008, 13:01 Category: Installing Views: 6946 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 4.6 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 4.6, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.
CentOS

Securing the CentOS Perfect Setup with Bastille

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: Security Views: 9114 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how to secure a CentOS server using psad, Bastille, and some other tweaks. psad is a tool that helps detect port scans and other suspicious traffic, and the Bastille hardening program locks down an operating system, proactively configuring the system for increased security and decreasing its susceptibility to compromise.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8812 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
FreeBSD

Reset MySQL password in FreeBSD

Post date: June 2, 2008, 12:06 Category: Software Views: 7897 Comments
Tutorial quote: Step by step howto for resetting MySQL password in FreeBSD 7 and MySQL 5.051a port.
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