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Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 3353 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Debian

Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Network Views: 3296 Comments
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
FreeBSD

Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4

Post date: December 1, 2005, 03:12 Category: Software Views: 5234 Comments
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Debian

Server Monitoring With munin And monit On Debian Lenny

Post date: February 28, 2010, 13:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4446 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this article I will describe how you can monitor your Debian Lenny server with munin and monit. munin produces nifty little graphics about nearly every aspect of your server (load average, memory usage, CPU usage, MySQL throughput, eth0 traffic, etc.) without much configuration, whereas monit checks the availability of services like Apache, MySQL, Postfix and takes the appropriate action such as a restart if it finds a service is not behaving as expected. The combination of the two gives you full monitoring: graphics that lets you recognize current or upcoming problems (like "We need a bigger server soon, our load average is increasing rapidly."), and a watchdog that ensures the availability of the monitored services.
CentOS

Serving CGI Scripts With Nginx On CentOS 6.0

Post date: October 23, 2011, 09:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 21548 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can serve CGI scripts (Perl scripts) with nginx on CentOS 6.0. While nginx itself does not serve CGI, there are several ways to work around this. I will outline two solutions: the first is to proxy requests for CGI scripts to Thttpd, a small web server that has CGI support, while the second solution uses a CGI wrapper to serve CGI scripts.
OpenSUSE

Virtual Box - How to Install & Configure in openSUSE

Post date: August 9, 2008, 17:08 Category: Emulation Views: 6827 Comments
Tutorial quote: VirtualBox is a family of powerful x86 virtualization products for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers, it is also the only professional solution that is freely available as Open Source Software under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL).
Ubuntu

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running LVM System (Ubuntu 10.04)

Post date: June 24, 2010, 10:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3247 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running LVM system (Ubuntu 10.04). The GRUB2 bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: December 7, 2007, 06:12 Category: Emulation Views: 6081 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 4246 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Linux

Change Ctrl + Alt + Delete Behavior To Open System Monitor, in Linux

Post date: September 24, 2009, 12:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2736 Comments
Tutorial quote: Actually, I've written this post before (quite a few months ago) but then deleted it because it didn't work. In the mean time, I found out why, so I decided to post it again. I find pressing Control + Alt + Delete to open up System Monitor to be very useful, especially for Windows users who are used to it and may actually press this quite a few times before realizing it doesn't do anything or what it does in Windows. Using System Monitor, you can preview all running processes, end or kill them, see how much CPU a process is using, CPU + memory + network history, available disk space and even change how much CPU a process should use.

There are 2 ways of changing Ctrl + Alt + Delete behavior to open System Monitor: one if you are running Compiz, and one for Metacity, only to use if you are not running Compiz.
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