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Search results for Running ISPConfig On Port 80 Using Apache's Reverse Proxy Feature (Debian Etch)

Fedora

Installing Nginx With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Fedora 13

Post date: July 27, 2010, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 3430 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nginx (pronounced "engine x") is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server. Nginx is known for its stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption. This tutorial shows how you can install Nginx on a Fedora 13 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.
CentOS

Installing Nginx With PHP5 And MySQL Support On CentOS 5.5

Post date: October 3, 2010, 16:10 Category: Installing Views: 4257 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nginx (pronounced "engine x") is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server. Nginx is known for its stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption. This tutorial shows how you can install Nginx on a CentOS 5.5 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.
OpenSUSE

Installing Nginx With PHP5 And MySQL Support On OpenSUSE 11.3

Post date: August 10, 2010, 15:08 Category: Installing Views: 3791 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nginx (pronounced "engine x") is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server. Nginx is known for its stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption. This tutorial shows how you can install Nginx on an OpenSUSE 11.3 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.
Ubuntu

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions With Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Post date: December 20, 2006, 01:12 Category: Installing Views: 4853 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers don't have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions: Ubuntu Edgy/Dapper, Debian Etch/Sarge, Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4.4, OpenSuSE 10.2, and Mandriva 2007.
Debian

Upgrade multiple debian systems with Approx

Post date: June 15, 2009, 06:06 Category: System Views: 5709 Comments
Tutorial quote: Approx is an HTTP-based Debian archive server. It fetches packages from remote repositories on demand, and caches them for local use.Approx saves time and network bandwidth if you need to install or upgrade Debian software for a number of machines on a local network.
Unix+clones

Two-in-one DNS server with BIND9

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: Software Views: 4836 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to configure BIND9 DNS server to serve an internal network and an external network at the same time with different set of information. To accomplish that goal, a new feature of BIND9 called view is used. As a tutorial it'll walk you through the whole set up, but initial knowledge of BIND and DNS is required, there are plenty of documents that cover that information on the Internet.
Gentoo

Bandwidth limiting howto

Post date: June 13, 2005, 02:06 Category: Network Views: 5199 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux has a very powerful mechanism for controlling network bandwidth usage. As being powerful inevitably implies being complex, this feature is documented in lengthy and exhaustive documents in great details. These documents however can prove to be excessive in their length and language to users who are looking for simple solutions for simple questions. This guide aims to give a short and practical introduction on how to solve some common issues that users tend to experience on an everyday basis.
CentOS

How To Install Qmailtoaster (CentOS 5.3)

Post date: June 19, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 8476 Comments
Tutorial quote: Qmailtoaster is a project that aims to make the installation of Qmail onto RPM based systems a snap. All of the packages are distributed in source RPMs so building the packages for your particular distro and architecture is as easy as running a script or a simple command for each package. The RPMs have all of the needed and commonly asked for patches included so you can have a mail server up and running in about an hour. When it's all complete, you'll have a full Qmail mail server installation ready for just about anything. I personally run Qmailtoaster servers for other companies and ISPs who have tens of thousands of users on their systems.
SuSe

Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: Desktop Views: 5373 Comments
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
Ubuntu

Insights for a quick and easy Ubuntu printer installation

Post date: June 4, 2006, 18:06 Category: Hardware Views: 8113 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu makes printing reasonably easy and straightforward. This brief article is for those who need a specific and encouraging step-by-step guide. I hope that this article will not only ensure that you print with ease, but that you have every reason to enjoy a productive GNU/Linux desktop.

Before you begin the installation steps below, connect your printer/s. You need to do this prior to turning your system on. This helps to ensure Ubuntu recognizes how the printer is connected to the system, and it allows Ubuntu to identify the specific printer port.

Please don’t be dismayed if you plug in your printer and it’s not immediately recognized. I assure you that Ubuntu recognizes the printer. However, you will first need to configure the printer as an available device so other programs can use it.

The Ubuntu Printing Configuration Tool is used to accomplish this. For my example I will use an HP Deskjet printer connected to the Ubuntu system via a USB cable. However, these steps will also apply to printers that connect via a direct or Parallel cable.
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