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Debian

Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2757 Comments
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Debian

Installing Maia Mailguard On Debian Lenny (Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix/MySQL)

Post date: July 8, 2010, 10:07 Category: Installing Views: 4187 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Maia Mailguard, a spam and virus management system, on a Debian Lenny mailserver. Maia Mailguard is a web-based interface and management system based on the popular amavisd-new email scanner and SpamAssassin. Written in Perl and PHP, Maia Mailguard gives end-users control over how their mail is processed by virus scanners and spam filters, while giving mail administrators the power to configure site-wide defaults and limits.
Linux

Automating the Login Script

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2795 Comments
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3899 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Linux

Custom Monitoring MySQL and SNMP with BixData

Post date: February 3, 2007, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3534 Comments
Tutorial quote: With BixData you can monitor your servers as well as VMware and Xen. BixData includes pre-built plugins for things like CPU, Memory, Disk, etc. but any good monitoring tool needs to be customizable. BixData includes the basic ability to run scripts and record their exit values, similar to Nagios Plugins. BixData 2.7 adds support for importing data in more complex formats. This allows you to monitor almost anything. I'll go through the steps showing you how to monitor MySQL locally where an agent is installed and then the steps to monitor a device remotely through SNMP. The advantage of BixData is that any data available through a BixAgent works with the standard tools such as the situation room, scoreboards, notifications and the reporting system. All data are stored in standard SQL tables and are easily accessible.
Debian

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Post date: May 3, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3784 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny. If you are concerned about your privacy, you might want to consider using hard disk encryption to protect your valuable private data from spying eyes. Usually, the easiest way would be to use your distribution's installer to set up a fully encrypted system; I think most recent Linux distributions support this. However, when you are using XEN to provide virtualization, there are situations where you might not want to encrypt your whole computer with all guest instances, but instead only encrypt one OS instance. This howto will deal with exactly this situation. It assumes that the XEN host system is already up and running.
SuSe

Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 3692 Comments
Tutorial quote: SUSE Linux is one of the better desktop Linux distributions on the market today, providing a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for the new Linux user as well as seasoned veterans. On thing that puzzles many users is the lack of proper multimedia support in SUSE. The developers have basically crippled it from playing virtually all types of multimedia content that's common on the Internet today. This can be a frustrating dilema for new users, so I have written a short HOWTO to help you get everything in order on your new desktop.

It should be noted that you don't necessarily need to install apt to fix the multimedia problem on SUSE, but it's probably the most beneficial way to get it done. You can easily remove the offending packages and install new ones not provided by SUSE, but by using apt, you'll get the benefit of having a much larger package base available to you... something that SUSE has suffered from for a very long time. With or without apt, let's get things going with this HOWTO.
Unix+clones

How To Automate Spamcop Submissions

Post date: May 26, 2006, 07:05 Category: Network Views: 3351 Comments
Tutorial quote: Spamcop is a service which provides RBLs for mailservers in order to reject incoming mail from spammers.

Their philosophy is to process possible spam complaints from users. When they receive a certain amount of complaints during a time-period then they will blacklist the offender. This system is dependant on spam reporting from users. However, their submission process is not very user-friendly.

As I have said above, Spamcop is pretty much dependant on the user input. If no one submits and verifies spam, then they will have no blacklist. However that whole submission and verification process is a bit annoying. Why should I bother to actually submit spam to spamcop and have it verified? If I just delete it, that will take less time...

The human being isn't really made to do repeating things. This gets quickly boring and hence my idea to automate this submission and verfication process.
In this howto I will show you how I achieved that. All I do is just putting the spam into certain folders and our good old friend cron does the rest.
Unix+clones

How to Set Up a Jabber Server

Post date: April 12, 2005, 16:04 Category: Software Views: 6783 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.
FreeBSD

ZFS Quick Start Guide

Post date: March 27, 2008, 20:03 Category: System Views: 10140 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ok, ZFS is now in the tree, what's now? Below you'll find some instructions how to quickly get it up and running.
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