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SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 6335 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
Solaris

NIST Publically-Released Fedora/Red Hat Core Security Guide

Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Security Views: 7263 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
Debian

Creating an initrd image

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 4039 Comments
Tutorial quote: When I started booting a box with multiple SCSI adapters, I wanted to keep the device ordering sane. I find it’s best when the boot ordering matches the order in which Linux initializes the drivers for each controller. One effective way to handle this under Debian GNU/Linux with one of the stock kernels is to create a custom initrd image.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4290 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Ubuntu

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty)

Post date: April 24, 2009, 06:04 Category: System Views: 4640 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop and Server editions and Ubuntu Netbook Remix, continuing Ubuntu’s tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.This tutorial will explain how to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibix) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) released on the 23rd March 2009.

Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: June 30, 2007, 00:06 Category: Installing Views: 3838 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 7.04

Post date: May 16, 2007, 00:05 Category: Desktop Views: 5564 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu Studio is a special Linux distribution tailored to the needs of audio, video, and graphic enthusiasts or professionals. Because Ubuntu Studio is based on Ubuntu, you are not limited to this area, but can install any application that is available for Ubuntu, thus turning Ubuntu Studio into a normal desktop for everyday use. This tutorial shows how you can turn Ubuntu Studio 7.04 into a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Debian

Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ

Post date: March 20, 2006, 20:03 Category: System Views: 4049 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
FreeBSD

Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Installing Views: 4386 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.
Debian

How To Set Up SSL Vhosts Under Nginx + SNI Support (Ubuntu 11.04/Debian Squeeze)

Post date: September 13, 2011, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6217 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how you can set up SSL vhosts under nginx on Ubuntu 11.04 and Debian Squeeze so that you can access the vhost over HTTPS (port 443). SSL is short for Secure Sockets Layer and is a cryptographic protocol that provides security for communications over networks by encrypting segments of network connections at the transport layer end-to-end. In addition to that I will show how to make use of SNI (Server Name Indication) to allow multiple SSL vhosts per IP address.
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