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Search results for Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server On A Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) System

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Software Views: 3326 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.0) on a Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) system.

VMware has just released version 1.0.0 of its free VMware Server. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) as the host operating system.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!
FreeBSD

Upgrading FreeBSD

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 3543 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
Gentoo

Gentoo VSFTPD Howto

Post date: May 4, 2005, 18:05 Category: Network Views: 5369 Comments
Tutorial quote: This serves as an explicit guide as to how one goes about setting up a VSFTPD server on a Gentoo Linux computer. Though written for Gentoo, these instructions apply to other Linux distributions as well.
Linux

Roll Your Own Firewall

Post date: March 28, 2006, 21:03 Category: Network Views: 3058 Comments
Tutorial quote: A comprehensive user friendly guide to setting up your own firewall on GNU/Linux.
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 14688 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Linux

Setting Up An iSCSI Environment On Linux

Post date: August 29, 2007, 22:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3736 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nowadays, the iSCSI technology is quite popular in the storage world. This article shows an iSCSI demo environment which consists of one Debian Linux host and one Netapp Filer. We try to show the most important features of this protocol.
SuSe

Using DSL with Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3511 Comments
Tutorial quote: The following tips will hopefully help give a well rounded view into the necessary settings and configuration that apply to most newer flavors. For older flavors using KDE or older versions of SuSe, you will need to install the PPPoE driver before configuration is possible. These drivers should be on your Linux flavor’s website.

You'll find that connectivity to your broadband service using almost all flavors of Linux is dependent on two things: what type of service you have purchased and correctly setting the IP and DNS configurations.
Solaris

Installing Solaris 8 x86

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Installing Views: 3297 Comments
Tutorial quote: Solaris x86 can picky when it comes to hardware. It may not work on hardware that's not listed in the HCL (Hardware Compatibility List). My older Pentium system's motherboard was OK, and it found the hard-drive I had connected to the primary IDE channel (on the motherboard) but it wouldn't recognize the CD-ROM drive even though it was connected to the secondary IDE channel on the motherboard. (I had better luck on a system where the CD-ROM drive was connected as the slave on the primary IDE channel. I prefer to keep the CD-ROM drive off the hard-drive channel but if all else fails you can try this to see if it works. :)
Debian

Manipulating the windows upon your desktop

Post date: January 19, 2006, 13:01 Category: Desktop Views: 2655 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're like me you'll most likely use a wide variety of desktop applications, and spend a lot of time setting up your desktop first thing in the afternoon when you login. Minimising some applications, setting others up to be visible upon all virtual desktops, etc. Even if you have a basic window manager you can automate this activity using Devil's Pie.

Devil's Pie is a simple utility, inspired by the Sawfish's matched windows option, which allows you to conduct actions upon desktop windows. Using it is a simple matter of creating a configuration file and starting the program when you login.
Linux

Setting up a serial console

Post date: February 19, 2007, 19:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3478 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will show you how to set up a serial console on a Linux system, and connect to it via a null modem cable. This is quite useful if your Linux server is in a headless configuration (no keyboard or monitor), as it allows you to easily get a console on the system if there are any problems with it (especially network problems, when SSH is not available). In the end, the GRUB menu will appear over the serial link, as will the bootup messages (output when booting the system). I am using Debian Etch on the server and Ubuntu Edgy on my client, although this should work on any Linux distribution.
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