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Search results for Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

OpenSUSE

BasKet - opensource note pad for openSUSE

Post date: September 4, 2008, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3192 Comments
Tutorial quote: BasKet Note Pads is a free opensource notepad/scrible pad software for Linux. BasKet can be used as a manual clipboard. This means that you can drop files of all kinds inside. They can be grouped in different tabs. BasKet is very simple to use and easy to differentiate between notes by setting tags, priorities and flags.
Linux

Building a Linux virtual server

Post date: June 9, 2005, 14:06 Category: Software Views: 3019 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the explosive growth of the Internet, the workload on servers providing Web, email, and media services has increased greatly. More and more sites are being challenged to keep up with the growing demands and are employing several techniques to avoid overloading their servers. Building a scalable server on a cluster of computers is one of the solutions that is being effectively put to use. With such a cluster, the increasing requests can be easily managed by simply adding one or more new servers to the existing cluster as required. In this article we will look at setting up one such scalable, network load-balancing server cluster using a virtual server via the Linux Virtual Server Project.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3708 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
FreeBSD

Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Installing Views: 3567 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.
Unix+clones

Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance

Post date: June 25, 2005, 01:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 4254 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 5455 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Post date: June 10, 2007, 22:06 Category: Installing Views: 4340 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Linux

Setting Up Subversion for One or Multiple Projects

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3986 Comments
Tutorial quote: Deploying a secure and manageable Subversion installation that uses Apache 2.0 as a central authentication checkpoint and SSL for data integrity and confidentiality.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 2516 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 4027 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
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