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Search results for Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Ubuntu

Setting Up An Android App Build Environment With Eclipse, Android SDK, PhoneGap (Ubuntu 10.10)

Post date: January 27, 2011, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 2420 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how you can set up a development environment for building Android apps on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop using Eclipse, the Android SDK, and PhoneGap. I will describe how to build Android apps from the command line with PhoneGap and from the GUI with Eclipse and PhoneGap and how to test them in an Android emulator and on a real Android device. PhoneGap allows you to develop your Android applications using web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (e.g. with JavaScript libraries such as jQuery/jQTouch), and it will turn these web apps into native Android apps (in fact, PhoneGap supports multiple platforms such as Android, iPhone, Palm, Windows Mobile, Symbian, so you can use the same sources to create apps for multiple platforms).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Etch

Post date: October 29, 2007, 09:10 Category: Network Views: 4663 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Etch

Post date: November 7, 2007, 11:11 Category: Network Views: 4467 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Linux

Installing Ubuntu Or Fedora From A Windows Or Linux System With UNetbootin

Post date: October 7, 2007, 09:10 Category: Installing Views: 3789 Comments
Tutorial quote: UNetbootin is a tool that allows you to install various Linux distributions (Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, OpenSuSE, Debian, ArchLinux) from a Windows or a Linux desktop over the internet (i.e., you do not need to burn the Ubuntu, Fedora, ... CDs). Unlike the Ubuntu installation with Wubi, real partitions are created during the installation. In the end, you have a dual-boot system (Linux/Windows or Linux/Linux).
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3597 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
Linux

Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer

Post date: June 24, 2005, 14:06 Category: System Views: 2607 Comments
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
Linux

First Steps Of Running Linux Via Terminal Instead Of Desktop

Post date: August 8, 2011, 07:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3185 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is supposed to show new Linux users how to handle Linux without having to browse through your desktop to edit files. The core commands to do this are the same on every Linux distribution, however there is a large variety of commands that differ from distribution to distribution, as does the install command.
Debian

Setting Up A Highly Available NFS Server

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 6284 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to set up a highly available NFS server that can be used as storage solution for other high-availability services like, for example, a cluster of web servers that are being loadbalanced. If you have a web server cluster with two or more nodes that serve the same web site(s), than these nodes must access the same pool of data so that every node serves the same data, no matter if the loadbalancer directs the user to node 1 or node n. This can be achieved with an NFS share on an NFS server that all web server nodes (the NFS clients) can access.

As we do not want the NFS server to become another "Single Point of Failure", we have to make it highly available. In fact, in this tutorial I will create two NFS servers that mirror their data to each other in realtime using DRBD and that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one NFS server fails, the other takes over silently. To the outside (e.g. the web server nodes) these two NFS servers will appear as a single NFS server.

In this setup I will use Debian Sarge (3.1) for the two NFS servers as well as for the NFS client (which represents a node of the web server cluster).
White+Box

The perfect Setup - White Box Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Installing Views: 6044 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Linux server based on White Box Linux that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Since White Box Linux is very similar to Red Hat Enterprise Linux this tutorial should also work for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
Linux

What's up, Doc? A guide to Linux Documentation

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 2807 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're new to Linux, you've probably been told to read the manual, but what good is that advice if you don't know where the manuals are or how to use them? Here, in one place, is complate instructions on how to find and navigate the common Linux documentation systems, including man, info, READMEs, HOWTOs, HTML, PDF/PS, DocBook, Gnome and KDE help system, and command-line option conventions. The guide I wish I'd had when I was new to Linux!
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