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Linux

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

Post date: June 19, 2007, 02:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3096 Comments
Tutorial quote: Subversion is a free/open-source version control system. That is, Subversion manages files and directories over time. A tree of files is placed into a central repository. The repository is much like an ordinary file server, except that it remembers every change ever made to your files and directories. This allows you to recover older versions of your data, or examine the history of how your data changed. In this regard, many people think of a version control system as a sort of time machine.
Linux

Share Your Music Collection With gnump3d

Post date: August 1, 2007, 23:08 Category: Software Views: 3182 Comments
Tutorial quote: Gnump3d is a streaming server that can help you share your music collection with others. Although the name is using mp3 it can serve ogg as well, so you don't have to convert all your mp3 files to ogg files.
Linux

Storing Files/Directories In Memory With tmpfs

Post date: December 9, 2008, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2955 Comments
Tutorial quote: You probably know that reading from RAM is a lot of faster than reading files from the hard drive, and reduces your disk I/O. This article shows how you can store files and directories in memory instead of on the hard drive with the help of tmpfs (a file system for creating memory devices). This is ideal for file caches and other temporary data (such as PHP's session files if you are using session.save_handler = files) because the data is lost when you power down or reboot the system.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3358 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Linux

How To Set Up A Facebook RSS Feed Reader Application For Your Blog

Post date: September 2, 2007, 23:09 Category: Programming Views: 5433 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can build an RSS feed reader application for the social network Facebook that will display your blog's/web site's RSS feed on the profile pages of Facebook users (that have installed the RSS feed reader application). Each item of the RSS feed will have a Share button so that people can share the story with their friends, and the application will have an Invite link so that people can invite up to ten friends at once to also install this feed reader application. I will use PHP5 to build the RSS feed reader application. To parse the RSS feed and generate HTML from it, I will use Magpie RSS.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3336 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Ubuntu

Multisite CVS Drupal Installation on Ubuntu

Post date: August 6, 2007, 23:08 Category: Installing Views: 2637 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto shows you how to do a multi-site Drupal install on Ubuntu. It also covers how to layout your directories for ease of maintenance, and how to ensure that you can update Drupal easily from CVS.
Ubuntu

Unison - file synchronization tool

Post date: May 11, 2008, 14:05 Category: Software Views: 4205 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unison is a file-synchronization tool for Unix and Windows. It allows two replicas of a collection of files and directories to be stored on different hosts (or different disks on the same host), modified separately, and then brought up to date by propagating the changes in each replica to the other.

Gentoo

Creating a WebDAV server with apache2

Post date: May 26, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 4913 Comments
Tutorial quote: I needed a way to share information (both read and write) as easy as possible with friends in a quite restricted environment (firewall). In many cases, WebDAV which uses standard HTTP port 80 for comunication is a good solution for a file server application.
Debian

bsc - graphical file manager with two panels

Post date: April 24, 2007, 04:04 Category: Desktop Views: 2667 Comments
Tutorial quote: bsc (BeeSoft Commander) is a graphical file manager (similar to the midnight commander) that displays two directories at once for easier copying and moving of files.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink