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OpenSUSE

Clive - Download videos from YouTube & other video sharing websites

Post date: August 15, 2008, 22:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 4210 Comments
Tutorial quote: clive is an open source command line tool to extract videos and to bypass the need to use Adobe Flash in order to view user-generated content available on video-sharing websites. Clive supports Youtube, GoogleVideo, Dailymotion, metacafe, Guba, Sevenload, Myvideo. Clive converts the downloaded Flash Video into a MP4 file avoiding the need of having a Flash Video Player.
Linux

Editing Images With Pinta

Post date: October 11, 2011, 07:10 Category: Desktop Views: 5464 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is about how to use the Pinta graphical editor to edit pictures and covers some of its most important features. Pinta is a lightweight image editor for Linux and is far more easier to handle than Gimp but still has a large variety of tools and features to use. It can be used for quick editing like resizing images or adjusting the colours of photographs, but also for more professional tasks which depend on layered images and more. It is a good mixture between MS Paint and professional image editing tools and is recommendable for most purposes of image-editing-everyday-use.
SuSe

A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: System Views: 5000 Comments
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Gentoo

Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat

Post date: January 29, 2006, 13:01 Category: Network Views: 13386 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Ubuntu

Blogging From Ubuntu Using Drivel

Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3940 Comments
Tutorial quote: Drivel is a GNOME client for working with online journals, also known as weblogs or simply blogs. It retains a simple and elegant design while providing many powerful features.
FreeBSD

How I created my own .mac replacement

Post date: February 7, 2006, 21:02 Category: Network Views: 4431 Comments
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
Ubuntu

Installing DSpace 1.5 on Ubuntu 8.10/9.04 Server

Post date: October 7, 2009, 14:10 Category: Software Views: 4904 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing Dspace -1.5 on Ubuntu. Dspace is a web-based application to manage your e-papers, files, videos, etc

DSpace open source software enables open sharing of content that spans organizations, continents and time.
Linux

Traffic shaping and bandwidth management

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 5111 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is from the perspective of a small network, possibly a couple of people sharing one connection. It will explain traffic shaping and bandwidth management in general and with linx. It (sort of) walks through building a traffic shaping router.
Debian

Sharing a printer to Windows XP clients with Samba and Cups

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Network Views: 9053 Comments
Tutorial quote: Setting a printer in Debian Sarge from scratch and make it available for Windows XP clients on a LAN can be difficult, but using CUPS and samba it should be fairly straightforward if you have a supported printer. Here we will demonstrate how to do this.
Debian

Installing And Working With eyeOS Under Debian 4.0

Post date: June 11, 2007, 20:06 Category: Software Views: 4265 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install eyeOS on a standard Linux system. EyeOS is a kind of operating system which works online, i.e. it manages files on the server and enables the user to upload, download and edit files.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink