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Linux

Solving the ugly key problem

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 3395 Comments
Tutorial quote: You have one of the finest operating systems running on you computer and you are pleased with the setup of your desktop. Proud and happy as you are you look at your computer. You look down to the keyboard and what are those ugly keys in the lower row of your keyboard? Win-keys??!

Even though you might not be using those keys it is still annoying and stressful to see them. How can we replace them by penguin keys?

This short tip presents two solutions for this problem.
Debian

Setting Up Master-Master Replication With MySQL 5 On Debian Etch

Post date: October 25, 2007, 11:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3131 Comments
Tutorial quote: Since version 5, MySQL comes with built-in support for master-master replication, solving the problem that can happen with self-generated keys. In former MySQL versions, the problem with master-master replication was that conflicts arose immediately if node A and node B both inserted an auto-incrementing key on the same table. The advantages of master-master replication over the traditional master-slave replication are that you do not have to modify your applications to make write accesses only to the master, and that it is easier to provide high-availability because if the master fails, you still have the other master.
Fedora

Master-Master Replication With MySQL 5 On Fedora 8

Post date: February 19, 2008, 11:02 Category: Network Views: 3220 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up master-master replication with MySQL 5 on Fedora 8. Since version 5, MySQL comes with built-in support for master-master replication, solving the problem that can happen with self-generated keys. In former MySQL versions, the problem with master-master replication was that conflicts arose immediately if node A and node B both inserted an auto-incrementing key on the same table. The advantages of master-master replication over the traditional master-slave replication are that you do not have to modify your applications to make write accesses only to the master, and that it is easier to provide high-availability because if the master fails, you still have the other master.
Debian

Processing 10000 Pictures Using Many Computers With Oropo (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: April 27, 2010, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 2793 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever had a lot of data to process? In such a moment after a while of processing we realize that it will take ages to complete. It would be faster if we could use two or three or even more computers. Let's use some computers - you think it is a lot of configuration? You are wrong. With Oropo it's easy. Let's discuss a problem of processing large number of pictures. First approach for solving this problem is to process pictures sequentially on one computer. Second approach is to process pictures parallelly on many computers.
Unix+clones

Using Public Key Authentication with SSH

Post date: June 26, 2008, 10:06 Category: Network Views: 4673 Comments
Tutorial quote: The current leading SSH server, OpenSSH, offers two main methods of authentication: interactive password and public key authentication. While interactive password authentication is the default, there are several reasons for using public key authentication. After reading some background information about public key cryptography, you should have a firm understanding of what public key cryptography is and how it works. You're welcome to skip straight to generating keys for use with SSH. Setting up public key authentication will require a few minutes, but the results are worthwhile.
Unix+clones

Setup the SSH server to use keys for authentication

Post date: November 16, 2005, 20:11 Category: Network Views: 3122 Comments
Tutorial quote: The user creates a keypair, which consists of a private key, that can be protected with a passphrase, and a public key. The public key is transfered to the server and the private key is kept in our workstation. We assume that the user has accounts in both the server machine and his workstation. Everytime he tries to connect to the server, the keys are validated and the user is granted access.
Unix+clones

Good-looking fonts in X Windows

Post date: April 23, 2005, 09:04 Category: Desktop Views: 2471 Comments
Tutorial quote: What makes the difference betweek "ugly" and "beautiful" fonts? Several things.

One of them is anti-aliasing (or AA in short). It's the technique which adds gray pixels in various shades around the edges of black text and thus blurs the jagged and pixelated edges. It works with other colors, too.

Another thing is having good quality fonts to start with. Font which are ugly by nature or don't scale well to various sizes are not much nicer when anti-aliased. See what kinds of fonts are out there by browsing through the Font HOWTO (not the same as the FDU HOWTO above).

Finally, there's the issue of readability which applies to you directly. How well does the end-product look anyhow? Do you really need anti-aliasing for an 8 pixel text? And other similar questions, which you'll learn how to answer according to your own preferences.
Linux

Key-Based SSH Logins With PuTTY

Post date: December 10, 2006, 20:12 Category: Security Views: 3440 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to generate and use a private/public key pair to log in to a remote system with SSH using PuTTY. PuTTY is an SSH client that is available for Windows and Linux (although it is more common on Windows systems). Using key-based SSH logins, you can disable the normal username/password login procedure which means that only people with a valid private/public key pair can log in. That way, there is no way for brute-force attacks to be successful, so your system is more secure.
RedHat

Getting back my GNOME desktop from the clutches of the GNOME configuration system

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Desktop Views: 5902 Comments
Tutorial quote: My problem: as a user I managed to lock myself out of my GNOME desktop though a careless setting of Preferences-> Resolution.

In determining my solution I learned some key lessons about the GNOME configuration system.
OpenSUSE

Linux Kernel Magic SysRq keys in openSUSE for crash recovery

Post date: September 28, 2008, 17:09 Category: System Views: 3331 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux Kernel offers you something that allows you to recover your system from a crash or at the least lets you to perform a proper shutdown using the Magic SysRq Keys. The magic SysRq key is a select key combination in the Linux kernel which allows the user to perform various low level commands regardless of the system’s state using the SysRq key. It is often used to recover from freezes, or to reboot a computer without corrupting the filesystem.
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