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Search results for Solving the ugly key problem

Debian

How To Set Up SSH With Public-Key Authentication On Debian Etch

Post date: March 30, 2008, 13:03 Category: Security Views: 3478 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up an SSH server on Debian Etch with public-key authorization (and optionally with disabled password logins). SSH is a great tool to control Linux-based computers remotely. It is safe and secure.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10

Post date: March 5, 2009, 08:03 Category: System Views: 3900 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the
file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of
eCryptfs as a sort of “gnupgfs”.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)

Post date: January 13, 2009, 13:01 Category: System Views: 4063 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of eCryptfs as a sort of “gnupgfs”.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.

SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 5391 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3138 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Linux

Sawing Linux Logs with Simple Tools

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Security Views: 2695 Comments
Tutorial quote: So there you are with all of your Linux servers humming along happily. You have tested, tweaked, and configured until they are performing at their peak of perfection. Users are hardly whining at all. Life is good. You may relax and indulge in some nice, relaxing rounds of TuxKart. After all, you earned it.

Except for one little remaining chore: monitoring your log files. [insert horrible alarming music of your choice here.] You're conscientious, so you know you can't just ignore the logs until there's a problem, especially for public services like Web and mail. Somewhere up in the pointy-haired suites, they may even be plotting to require you to track and analyze all sorts of server statistics.

Not to worry, for there are many ways to implement data reduction, which is what log parsing is all about. You want to slice and dice your logs to present only the data you're interested in viewing. Unless you wish to devote your entire life to manually analyzing log files. Even if you only pay attention to logfiles when you're debugging a problem, having some tools to weed out the noise is helpful.
Debian

Recovering from file system corruption using TestDisk

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: System Views: 2803 Comments
Tutorial quote: We've all been there. We press the wrong key, we do some silly mistake, and suddenly, one or more of our file systems refuse to work. Whenever this happens, the first thing we hear is "You should have made a backup", the dreaded sentence that we'll never listen to. Let's face it, we're stupid, and we don't backup.
Unix+clones

OpenSSH/Keychain Howto

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3514 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will show you the fundamental ways to use OpenSSH; how to generate public/private key pairs and strong passphrases, and how to use the wonderful Keychain utility to automate your SSH logins. This is exceptionally handy when you log in and out frequently, and don't want to keep entering your passphrase.
Unix+clones

KMail In Depth

Post date: April 13, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 2578 Comments
Tutorial quote: KMail has long been my Linux email client of choice for a number of reasons: nice clean interface, easily customizable and configurable, stable, and more features than you can shake a stick at. Today we'll dig into migrating from other email clients, encrypting messages and key signing, and configuring multiple accounts and identities.
Debian

Running network services as a non-root user

Post date: April 20, 2006, 10:04 Category: Security Views: 3184 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are many times when it is convenient to allow non-root users to run services, or daemons, which bind to "privileged ports". There are several approaches to this problem each with its own set of pros and cons. Read on for a brief look at the most common approaches.
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